New ‘You Are Here’ art installation unveiled in downtown Salt Lake City

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SALT LAKE CITY -- A new art installation at the Salt Palace Convention Center in downtown Salt Lake City features more than 150 road signs and invites viewers to take a seat and a photo.

According to a press release from the Salt Lake County Center for the Arts, the "Point of View" art installation was designed to, "become the place to have one's picture taken in Salt Lake City. Like other cities that have iconic artwork or architecture, this new installation beckons people to sit down and be a part of the art."

The installation features more than 150 standard road signs that are placed near the front of an entrance to the convention center, and each sign features diametrical words like "catch/throw" or "speak/silence".

Splashes of red on the signs create the message, "You Are Here". The logo is visible and well-defined when looking straight-on but is not visible from the sides.

“The contrasting phrases and interesting word selection align with the Salt Palace’s sense of place," said Dan Hayes, General Manager of the Salt Palace. "It’s a facility in which there is discourse, questioning and learning. ‘Point of View’ illustrates those disciplines very well.”

The installation was created after 26 applications were received, and an Art Selection Committee reviewed and scored each application to determine which would be brought to life at the Salt Palace. Maine artist Aaron T. Stephan created the "Point of View" installation.

“Thousands of visitors come to the Salt Palace annually to take advantage of the great hospitality, cultural and convention amenities here in Salt Lake County. Their future photos in front of ‘You Are Here’ will be a fun reminder of the great times they enjoyed during their stay,” Salt Lake County Mayor Ben McAdams stated in the press release.

The project was funded in part by the Salt Lake County 1% for Public Art Program.