Cyclist gets ticket after colliding with car in St. George

This is an archived article and the information in the article may be outdated. Please look at the time stamp on the story to see when it was last updated.

Bicyclist ticketed after hit by car, St. George, Utah, June 24, 2015 | Photo by Ric Wayman, St. George News

ST. GEORGE, Utah – Officers gave a man on a bicycle a ticket after he was hit by a car in St. George.

According to the St. George News, the bicyclist escaped serious injury after he crossed in front of a car that was coming out of a parking lot near 700 E. and 700 S. Wednesday afternoon.

Police said the car stopped and then pulled forward, partially blocking the sidewalk when the cyclist swerved out in front of the car.

The car and the bicycle had minor damage but no one was injured.

A bicyclist escapes injury after being struck by a car, St. George, Utah, June 24, 2015 | Photo by Ric Wayman, St. George News

A bicyclist escapes injury after being struck by a car, St. George, Utah, June 24, 2015 | Photo by Ric Wayman, St. George News

“Bicyclists should go with the traffic in the street,” St. George Police Sgt. Craig Harding told the St. George News. “Unless they’re little kids and then they can ride on the sidewalk but there is a city ordinance against riding on the sidewalk.”

The man on the bike was ticketed for failing to yield.

“There is a state law that says that bicyclists should be on the extreme right side of the roadway in the direction of traffic, not against traffic because then you avoid crashes like this, with people pulling out looking to their left to see if there is a car coming so they can pull out and turn right,” Harding said.

MORE: Read more from the St. George News here

6 comments

  • David Whittington

    I ride a bicycle often in St. George. There are stretches of road in the area that essentially have little or NO right side road shoulder – a situation that demands riding on the sidewalk. Also – St. George is full of aging people with less than perfect eyesight. I feel MUCH safer riding on a sidewalk as opposed to venturing out into a car lane full of ’78 Crown Vic behemoths driven by squinting octogenarians.

  • Ace

    Yes, please follow the laws bicyclists. I know you want to run in and out of traffic and get away from people, but you have to follow the laws. You are going to kill someone.

    • Levi Roberts

      I really despise the “us” vs. “them” sentiment. I am a cyclist, a pedestrian, and a motorist, but most of all, I am a PERSON. The reality is that someone riding a bicycle is very unlikely to kill anyone, while thousands of people driving cars kill people every day. It is a difficult environment to navigate if you are someone that would like to get out of your car and use human power to travel. In some situations the road is the most practical, in others the sidewalk is. I live in St George, and in this particular location on 700 South, riding on the roadway is extremely dicey at best. I wasn’t on the scene, but it appears that the incident could have been prevented by the motorist or the cyclist. I agree with David Wittington, that it is completely impractical to force people onto the roadway in all situations. If we are going to even begin to tackle the obesity epidemic in this country, we need to make safe, active transportation legal.

  • Allan

    Sidewalk riding is generally much less safe than riding in the street, especially when riding against traffic flow. Some cyclists ride there because they’re admonished to do so by drivers. Regardless, when we drive our motor vehicles, we have a legal and ethical responsibility to watch for others.

    St. George Police Sgt. Craig Harding ought to reacquaint himself with the law which he enforces. His quote is incorrect and divisive: “There is a state law that says that bicyclists should be on the extreme right side of the roadway…” Here’s what the law actually says, and it’s far different:

    41-6a-1105. Operation of bicycle or moped on and use of roadway — Duties, prohibitions.
    (1) A person operating a bicycle or a moped on a roadway at less than the normal speed of traffic at the time and place and under the conditions then existing shall ride as near as practicable to the right-hand edge of the roadway except when:
    (a) overtaking and passing another bicycle or vehicle proceeding in the same direction;
    (b) preparing to make a left turn at an intersection or into a private road or driveway;
    (c) traveling straight through an intersection that has a right-turn only lane that is in conflict with the straight through movement; or
    (d) reasonably necessary to avoid conditions that make it unsafe to continue along the right-hand edge of the roadway including:
    (i) fixed or moving objects;
    (ii) parked or moving vehicles;
    (iii) bicycles;
    (iv) pedestrians;
    (v) animals;
    (vi) surface hazards; or
    (vii) a lane that is too narrow for a bicycle and a vehicle to travel safely side by side within the lane.
    http://le.utah.gov/xcode/Title41/Chapter6A/41-6a-S1105.html?v=C41-6a-S1105_1800010118000101

Comments are closed.