14 Utah students suffer concussions each week; know the signs

SALT LAKE CITY — Fourteen Utah students suffer a concussion each week, according to new data from the Utah Department of Health, and most of them occur from September-November.

“A concussion is a type of traumatic brain injury – or TBI – caused by a bump, blow, or jolt to the head or by a hit to the body that causes the head and brain to move rapidly back and forth. A person injured from a concussion may experience symptoms ranging from mild to severe which may include headaches, fatigue, nausea or vomiting, double or blurry vision, feeling “sluggish” and “foggy,” or suffer from poor memory recall and concentration. Symptoms can linger for weeks or even months,” a news release from UDOH said.

UDOH gathered concussion data for the 2016-2019 school years and found 1,521 students suffered concussions while at school. More than half of those occurred among male students. Of the cases recorded, male students accounted for 59 percent of concussions and 37 percent of theme occurred during recess or physical education classes.

The concussions most often occurred as students were running (17 percent), playing football (10 percent) or walking (10 percent).

“A concussion is a type of traumatic brain injury – or TBI – caused by a bump, blow, or jolt to the head or by a hit to the body that causes the head and brain to move rapidly back and forth. A person injured from a concussion may experience symptoms ranging from mild to severe which may include headaches, fatigue, nausea or vomiting, double or blurry vision, feeling “sluggish” and “foggy,” or suffer from poor memory recall and concentration. Symptoms can linger for weeks or even months,” a news release from UDOH said.

Students who sustain a concussion may:
• Appear dazed or stunned
• Seem confused
• Lose memory of just before or after the injury
• Have balance, coordination, or gait problems
• Show a change in personality
• Respond slowly to questions
• Lose consciousness for any length of time; however, losing consciousness is not a requirement for a concussion diagnosis

If you or a loved one has experienced a concussion and want to determine if you qualify for services such as a neuropsychological evaluation, please contact the UDOH Health Resource Line at 1-888-222-2542 or health.utah.gov/tbi

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