11 Utahns have been infected with Salmonella Newport

This is an archived article and the information in the article may be outdated. Please look at the time stamp on the story to see when it was last updated.

SALT LAKE CITY — The Center for Disease Control and Prevention released updated numbers for the outbreak of Salmonella Newport Wednesday.

According to the CDC, 11 Utahns have been infected with salmonella, up from nine in November.

California saw the biggest jump in cases of infection, with the CDC reporting 107 current cases. California had just 66 in November. The total number of new cases since November, according to the CDC, is 87. New states included in the outbreak are Michigan, Mississippi and West Virginia.

The total number of people infected in the U.S. is 333. The CDC reports that 91 people have been hospitalized, but no deaths have been reported.

The outbreak is related to 5.2 million pounds of beef products recalled on December 4, and an additional 6.9 million pounds of beef products recalled October 4. Both recalls were made by JBS Tolleson, Inc.

The CDC advises consumers to check their freezer for beef products recalled by JBS Tolleson, Inc. of Tolleson, Arizona, and do not eat, serve or sell it, rather, throw it away or return it to where you bought it.

The products were produced and packaged from July 26 of this year to September 7 and shipped to retailers nationwide under many different brand names. You can find a full list of  stores where the contaminated beef was sold here.

For more information on the outbreak, and advice from the CDC, visit their website. For updated outbreak numbers by state, visit this CDC webpage.

Symptoms of salmonella include diarrhea, fever and stomach cramps. Symptoms can appear between 12 and 72 hours after a person is exposed the bacteria. According to the CDC, the illness typically lasts 4 to 7 days and most people recover without treatment.

However, some people may experience diarrhea severe enough to warrant a hospital visit. Children younger than five years old and adults older than 65, plus people with weakened immune systems are more likely to have sever symptoms.

 

Notice: you are using an outdated browser. Microsoft does not recommend using IE as your default browser. Some features on this website, like video and images, might not work properly. For the best experience, please upgrade your browser.