Police file search warrants for Uber account information, seeking answers after homicide of North Salt Lake man

File: Police

NORTH SALT LAKE, Utah – North Salt Lake Police filed two search warrants in a homicide investigation, in hopes that information from Uber accounts can give them a better idea of how a man was killed, and allegedly found by his wife lying in a pool of blood.

According to the search warrant affidavits filed in Utah’s Second District Court in Farmington and Davis County, on July 5 at around 11:13 a.m., North Salt Lake Police were dispatched to a home near 200 East Vista Way on reports of a medical emergency.

When officers arrived on the scene, the search warrants stated that they found a male, identified as Reed Christensen, “lying on the floor in a pool of blood.” It was determined that Christensen was the victim of a homicide.

When officers spoke with Christensen’s wife, she advised them that the pair went to a restaurant in Salt Lake City that day, where she and her husband had gotten into an argument.

“(They) then left the restaurant, where they continued driving on State Street in Salt Lake City,” the search warrants stated. “During the drive the argument continued.”

Police said Christensen’s wife told them she exited the vehicle during the fight, and that Christensen drove away. She then told police she asked a stranger to give her a ride to her son’s home. She said that her son was in California, but she had a key and was able to enter the home, where she stayed the night.

“(Christensen’s wife) stated she asked a stranger, who is a neighbor to her son, to use their cell phone to call her husband Reed. After Reed did not answer the phone, she ordered an UBER to take her home to her residence,” the search warrants stated.

On July 8 while investigating the homicide, officers were contacted by a woman who had allegedly let Christensen’s wife use her and her daughter’s phone to make several calls and order an Uber. She told police that her daughter used the Uber app to order Christensen’s wife a vehicle, which picked her up near her son’s apartment.

Christensen’s wife said that when she returned home, she saw that several drawers and cabinets were open in the kitchen area. She told police she called for her husband, but there was no answer, so she went upstairs, where she found Christensen lying in a pool of blood. Christensen’s wife then told police that she ran to a neighbor’s home to call 911.

Both search warrants filed were for information on the Uber accounts of the driver who picked up Christensen’s wife, and the account of the neighbor who allowed her to use the app.

“This information is needed to investigate the stories of witnesses/suspects, to identify possible witnesses/suspects, and establish a timeline and location of
involved person leading up to or following the homicide,” the search warrants stated.