Woman who has seen her share of darkness shares poignant note to teen who attempted suicide

UTAH COUNTY, Utah -- A woman who hit a teen after he threw himself in front of her car in Utah County is sharing a powerful message about suicide.

Nannette Wride-Zeeman was on her way home earlier this week when she hit the teen on a 50 mile per hour road. It was traumatizing for her and when she got home she had an overwhelming feeling to write him a note:

To the 18-year-old boy who threw himself in front of my car tonight in an attempt to end his life, I want to tell you you are loved.

I will never forget the look on your face as you stood looking at me through the dark, right into my headlights. I felt your pain for that brief moment in time and just wanted to let you know that I’ve been there too.

I want you to know there’s hope and you are loved. I want you to know that angels slowed my speed and told me to move to the other side of the road, you weren’t deterred at your attempt at ending your pain, you just dented my car a little and stopped my heart.

To that 18-year-old boy that wanted to die tonight, you apparently tried throwing yourself in front of five other cars, then you chose mine.

If you only knew the events that had to take place to stop you from dying tonight. If you only knew that four years ago the lives that were shattered so that my angel could change the events of this night.

You are loved, whoever you are. You may not feel like it right now, but you are loved by many here on earth, and many more on the other side. I pray for you.

Depression is real!! Suicide is but a permanent fix for a temporary problem. I know your problems seem endlessly dark right now but wait and you will see they will pass.

To that beautiful 18-year-old boy who stood in front of my car tonight, who I hit and I sobbed for fear I had hurt him, you are loved.

I will always pray for your heart to heal and for you to find who you are.

Wride-Zeeman understands the darkness more than most. In 2014 her late husband, Sgt. Cory Wride was shot and killed while trying to help a driver in Utah county.

She says she has tried to take her own life when it seemed impossible to move forward. She says she felt her late husband's guiding hand that night and knows that angels were watching over her and the teen.

While Wride-Zeeman knows the teen may never read her note,  she hopes it will remind others to reach out to those around them.

If you or someone you know seems to be struggling with depression and may be considering suicide, there are several ways to get help.

You can call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK or the University of Utah CrisisLine at 801-587-3000.