The brutal truth about texting and driving

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In the past decade, there's been a huge push in organizations warning against the dangers of texting and driving. With all the pushback, has there actually been a decrease in texting and driving related accidents? Unfortunately, according to Craig Swapp & Associates, no.

While 94 percent of drivers support a ban on texting while driving, shockingly, people just aren't keeping their hands and eyes off their phones while they drive. There is some fascinating science behind the reason we can't help but pick up the phone when we hear that text notification. Though texting and driving can be an issue for any driver, it's much more prevalent for the younger driving generation.

Anyone who's been through a driver's education course can tell you that taking your eyes off the road-for any reason-puts you, your passengers, and other vehicles in danger. Answering a text takes a drivers attention away for about 5 seconds, and if you're traveling at the average speed, that's enough time to travel the length of a football field.

A shocking study suggests that texting while driving is six times more likely to cause an accident than driving drunk. How many of us would never drink and drive, but often don’t hesitate to send a quick text? It’s a sobering reality.

Important steps have been taken to make texting and driving illegal. In Utah, the fines can range from $70 up to $750 if you’re caught texting behind the wheel. If texting while driving results in an accident, the driver who caused the accident can face a license suspension or even jail time.

Even with the threat of the law, people still text and drive. Craig Swapp & Associates urges families to educate their young drivers that texting while driving is simply unacceptable, and to remember that being an example is even more important. It’s on all of us as drivers to be responsible and to never text and drive.

For more information, visit www.craigswapp.com.