2 pit bulls fight in Sandy backyard; teen fatally stabs one dog to save the other

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SANDY, Utah – Two pit bulls kept on the same property in Sandy but in separate areas came into contact and began fighting Wednesday morning, and a teenager who tried to separate the dogs ended up stabbing and killing the more aggressive animal to protect the other dog.

Sgt. Dean Carriger of the Sandy Police Department said a homeowner in the area of 8500 South and 115 East owned two pit bull dogs that didn’t get along and were kept in separate areas of the property, but Wednesday around 10:30 a.m. the dogs somehow got out of their separated areas and came into contact.

“As a result, they got into a fight,” Carriger said of the dogs. “[The homeowner] went out in an attempt to separate them when he experienced some breathing issues. At that time, his teenage son went into the yard to separate the dogs, and in an effort to do so he ultimately had to stab one of the dogs to get the aggressive dog to stop attacking the other.”

Carriger said animal control personnel responded and are investigating, but he said at this point it appears no charges will be filed for the animal’s death as the teen was trying to protect one dog from the other.

“It’s just one of those things, animals can be unpredictable,” he said.

The man who was having breathing problems transported himself to a hospital as a precaution to be checked out because of the breathing issue, but neither the man nor the teen suffered injuries as a result of the dogs fighting.

34 comments

  • bob

    Just doing what pit bulls are bred to do. Oh, wait……I forgot that pit bulls are the only breed in the world whose behavior is not affected by their breeding. [/sarcasm]

    No matter how they’re raised, or how “sweet” they are, they’re wired to SNAP…..and once they snap they stay snapped until somebody is dead. It’s their job.

  • Kiyote (@Yotie72)

    ““It’s just one of those things, animals can be unpredictable,” he said.

    Well, yeah, I mean who here hasn’t had to try to break up a dog fight so brutal they nearly had a hearet attack doing it and had to have a freind or family member stab one of the other dogs to death?

  • Tom McCartney (@TomMcCartney71)

    Opinion: There is no need for pit bulls
    By Dr. David A. Billmire June 29, 2014

    Dr. Billmire is professor and director of the Division of Craniofacial and Pediatric Plastic Surgery at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center.

    As one who, for the last 30 years, has been on the receiving end of the dog-bite injuries that pass through the Children’s Hospital Emergency Room, as well as on the staff at the Shriners Hospitals for Children where we see the late effects of these injuries from across the nation, I can categorically tell you that the problems associated with dog bites are indeed breed-specific.

    When I started my career, the most common dog-bite injuries were from German shepherds and occasionally retrievers. These injuries were almost always provoked, such as food-related or stepping on the dog, and in almost every instance, the dog reacted with a single snap and release – essentially a warning shot. There were no pack attacks.

    Starting about 25 years ago, my colleagues and I started to see disturbingly different types of injuries. Instead of a warning bite, we saw wounds where the flesh was torn from the victim. There were multiple bite wounds covering many different anatomical sites. The attacks were generally unprovoked, persistent and often involved more than one dog. In every instance the dog involved was a pit bull or a pit bull mix.

    Now, I am a dog lover and virtually every one of my family members has a dog. But it is a fact that different dogs have always been bred for specific qualities. My sheltie herded, my daughter’s setter flushes birds and my pug sits on my lap – this is what they are bred for. Pit bulls were bred to fight and kill and, unfortunately, many current breeders favor these aggressive traits. There is no need for any dog with the characteristics.

    I recently gave a talk summarizing my 30 years of practice in pediatric plastic and reconstructive surgery, and one segment was titled “Why I Hate Pit Bulls.” I watched a child bleed to death one night in our operating room because a pit bull had torn his throat out. I have had to rebuild the skull of a child who had his ears and entire scalp torn off.

    I am currently reconstructing the face of a child, half of whose face has been torn off down to the bone. I have had to rebuild noses, lips, eyelids, jaws and cheeks of numerous children. On older children, I have had to reconstruct legs and hands. The unfortunate young victim whose recent attack has initiated this discussion will bear the scars of this attack for the rest of her life.

    Based on my extensive experience, I believe that the risk posed by pit bulls is equivalent to placing a loaded gun with the safety off on the coffee table. In my opinion, these dogs should be banned. I know this is an unpopular stand in some circles, but how many mauled children do we have to see before we realize the folly of allowing these dogs to exist?

    The arguments made by advocates of these dogs are the same arguments made by people who feel that assault weapons are an essential part of daily living. There are plenty of breeds available that peacefully coexist with human society. There is no need for pit bulls.

  • Tom McCartney (@TomMcCartney71)

    Wagging the Dog
    BY KATHY Y. WILSON · JUNE 25TH, 2014

    “I’m sure there are lovely pitbulls but I know the capacity of pitbulls to injure because of how they’re engineered.” — Judge Judy

    I thought I was done with pitbulls, with thinking about little Zanaibou Drame and all the Internet postulating about the two.

    But the Cincinnati police shooting last Friday of a stray pitbull in Bond Hill brought it all back to me.

    This, it seems, is pitbull season.

    Or, has it always been and I/we have been asleep? Or, is it that pits are appearing and attacking in such frequency that the media is doing due diligence in reporting on these dogs?

    Regardless, in this hour of the pitbull, I am again thinking about Zainabou, so much so that the 6-year-old — violently attacked June 4 by two pitbulls owned by her neighbors, a mother-and-son charged by police with drug dealing and gun possession — has shown up in my dreams.

    In them, I am visiting her classroom, listening to her young classmates talk about what kind of girl she is, how much fun she is to play and learn with and what they will say to her when she returns to school knowing she will not be able to verbally respond to them.

    When she does return they are comforting her the earnest way children do, knowing she has so much she wants to say to them but cannot. They stare at her but they also want to sit beside her at lunch and be her buddy on the playground.

    It comforts her for now but her family thinks about the rest of her life.

    Doctors could not save the girl’s tongue severed during the dogs’ attacks and it’s likely she will never speak again.

    There are presently nearly 100 comments from pitbull lovers and pitbull detractors on CityBeat dot com in response to my June 11 column, “The Pitbull Profile.”

    Some of the pitbull proponents cry “racism” at my description that typical pitbull owners are, among others, white trash meth cooks or drug dealers who use the dogs as vicious protection against the law and drug thieves. Those calling for the ban of pitbulls call this tactical outcry of “canine racism” a mere distraction from the larger issue: Pitbulls are ultimately dangerous animals regardless of how gently and lovingly they’re raised and pitbull attacks are on the rise.

    I stay mum to all that bickering and let the Internet chatterers slug it out; however, I am struck by how pitbulls have been relegated to outcast status among dog breeds.

    Even by me.

    But heinous things pitbulls do reflect on the pitbull community writ large, so pitbull criticism feels to their owners — to responsible owners — like direct criticism of all of them and not merely of the negligent owners who let their animals roam and terrorize neighborhoods.

    And though pet owners are now creepily calling themselves “pet parents,” pet ownership does not come anywhere close to parenting human children.

    I don’t doubt the love between owners and pets is real and valid, it just isn’t human love.

    I would ask all pitbull owners to pause all their emotional transference, all their misguided anger, the claims of breed discrimination and hatred, even and especially all their pitbull pride and think for five uninterrupted minutes about the terror, confusion and silence of Zainabou Drame, whose life was irrevocably changed when two pits latched onto her face, maimed her and stole her voice.

    Which brings me around to race and class.

    Because this is, like most things dividing us in America and Cincinnati, couched somewhat in race and class.

    A recent Cincinnati Pit Crew rally of pitbull owners reported by news stations showed scant blacks in attendance.

    Not that blacks do not own pitbulls.

    Clearly, we do.

    In this city’s black ghettos I see plenty of black people with pitbulls; we have romanticized a bad boy/stud relationship with pitbulls co-starring a fetishized obsession with the movie Scarface. The whole sordid thing is soundtracked by 2 Chainz or some other slack-jawed rapper.

    In these vignettes, blacks sport pitbulls like they’re matching parts of their outfits when really the pits are extensions of their personas: intimidating and ready to attack on a whim.

    The people who left their pits unsupervised to attack Zanaibou are black folks. I have noticed, however, that white people are generally in some supernaturally pious — and staunchly defensive — relationships with their dogs.

    These relationships transcend my understanding.

    At Black Meetings we talk all the time about how white people treat their dogs too much like precious little people and how that treatment goes eerily too far.

    We don’t get it, just like I’m sure there are things we do culturally — obsessing over whether or not Beyonce and Jay-Z are combing Blue Ivy’s nappy hair — that doesn’t resonate or make sense to white people. (Hell, that preoccupation doesn’t even make sense to me.)

    In 2007 When Michael Vick was charged, convicted and imprisoned for being part of a large dog-fighting ring, many blacks at the time thought he should have been punished but that his punishment — 21 months in prison — was too stiff and did not fit the crime.

    Meanwhile, the media exploded with white vitriol, with white folks who wanted Vick sentenced to life and to be forever banned from the NFL because white dog-love trumps a black man’s reach for contrition and rehabilitation.

    The black family of man’s curious and violent relationship with dogs might have something to do with this cultural and racial division.

    We have, after all, been hunted as runaways by dogs, attacked during protests for our civil rights by dogs and, historically, treated worse than dogs.

    Forgive us if we don’t have white-deep, white-abiding relationships with dogs ranking them superior to human lives in our own lives.

    There must be balance.

    Zainabou’s family will miss the girl she used to be more than Zontae and Volores Irby will miss their two dead pitbulls.

    This is proof of priorities.

    http://citybeat.com/cincinnati/article-30551-wagging_the_dog.html

  • Tom McCartney (@TomMcCartney71)

    Dog trainers/animal control, Pit Bull breeders, owners, fanciers, experts

    TRISH KING, Director, Behavior & Training Dept. Marin Humane Society

    “There is no direct eye contact or very little direct eye contact. It is very quick and over with. Which is one reason why with pit bulls and rottweilers, we have problems. Because they’re bred to do direct eye contact and so they are off putting to other dogs and actually scary to other dogs.”

    The fourth undesirable characteristic – arousal or excitement – is actually the most problematic. Many bully dogs cannot seem to calm themselves down once they get excited. And once they get excited all their behaviors are exacerbated.

    Thus, if a dog is over-confident and has a tendency to body slam or mount, he or she will really crash into the other dog or person when he’s aroused, sometimes inadvertently causing injury. He may begin to play-bite, and then bite harder and harder and harder.

    When you try to stop the behavior, the dog often becomes even more “aggressive.” In this way, play can turn into aggression fairly quickly. Research on the brain has shown that excited play has exactly the same chemistry as extreme anger. This allows a play behavior to switch quickly into aggression. And, once the dog has become aggressive a few times, the switch is much easier.
    HORSWELL BB, CHAHINE CJ, oral surgeons

    Dog bites of the facial region are increasing in children according to the Center for Disease Control. To evaluate the epidemiology of such injuries in our medical provider region, we undertook a retrospective review of those children treated for facial, head and neck dog bite wounds at a level 1 trauma center.

    Most dog bites occurred in or near the home by an animal known to the child/family. Most injuries were soft tissue related, however more severe bites and injuries were observed in attacks from the pit-bull and Rottweiler breeds.

    Younger (under five years) children sustained more of the injuries requiring medical treatment. Injury Severity Scales were determined as well as victim and payer mix demographics, type and characteristics of injury, and complications from the attack.

    DR RICHARD SATTIN, chief of unintentional-injuries section of the Centers of Disease Control

    We’re trying to focus public attention on this greatly underestimated public hazard.

    In 1979, pit bulls accounted for 20 percent of fatal attacks by dogs. That figure had risen to 62 percent by 1988.

    Nobody knows the dog population of the United States or the exact breakdown by breed. We do not believe that pit bulls represent anywhere near 42% percent of dogs in the United States. Therefore, we believe that the pit bull excess in deaths is real and growing.

    ROBERT D. NEWMAN, M.D.

    As a pediatrician I was disturbed to read Vicki Hearne’s assertion that there are no bad breeds, just bad dogs (Op-Ed, April 15). There is ample evidence to suggest that certain breeds of dogs are more dangerous to children than others.

    From 1979 to 1994, there were 177 known dog-bite-related fatalities in the United States. Of these fatalities, 66 percent were caused by five breeds: pit bull, Rottweiler, shepherd, husky and malamute.

    If you include crosses among these five breeds, that number rises to 82 percent. Other breeds, like Labrador retrievers and golden retrievers were not implicated in a single fatality during this same period.

    I laud the American Kennel Club’s attempt to include information about dog breeds considered ”not good with children” in the coming edition of ”The Complete Dog Book,” and lament the fact that the book is being recalled at the request of some breeders.

    Seattle, April 16, 1998

    Dr. EDGAR JOGANIK (after trying to reattach scalp and ear to a pit bull victim)

    Pit bull attacks are typically the most severe, and in about one-third of all attacks, the animals are family pets or belong to close friends.

    That should be the message, that these dogs should not be around children, adults are just as likely to be victims.

    Everyone should be extremely cautious.

    DR. MICHAEL FEALY

    When a Pit Bull is involved the bites are worse. When they bite, they bite and lock and they don’t let go… they bite lock and they rip and they don’t let go.

    DR. CHRISTOPHER DEMAS

    Bites from pit bulls inflict much more damage, multiple deep bites and ripping of flesh and are unlike any other domestic animal I’ve encountered. Their bites are devastating – close to what a wildcat or shark would do.

    DR. AMY WANDEL, plastic surgeon

    I see just as many dog bites from dogs that are not pit bulls as bites from pit bulls. The big difference is pit bulls are known to grab onto something and keep holding so their damage they create is worse than other breeds.

    DR. PATRICK BYRNE, Johns Hopkins Hospital

    I can’t think of a single injury of this nature that was incurred by any other species other than a pit bull or a rottweiler.

    ANDREW FENTON, M.D.

    As a practicing emergency physician, I have witnessed countless dog bites. Invariably, the most vicious and brutal attacks I have seen have been from the pit bull breed.

    Many of the victims have been children. In a recent study from the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, pit bull attacks accounted for more ER visits than all other breeds combined.

    In young children, the most common part of the body injured was the face. Numerous studies have proven that the number-one cause of dog bite fatalities is the pit bull breed.

    I am certain that many attacks are due to owner negligence, but the fact remains that many were unpredictable and were perpetrated by formerly “loving and loyal” pets.

    Dr. Chagnon has every right to leave our town as she claims she will if pit bulls are banned, just like every one of her patients has the right not to attend her clinic where she brings her pit bulls.

    I applaud Mayor Pro Tem Joanne Sanders for bringing this issue to the forefront. In the interest of public safety, I recommend we enforce a spay/neuter requirement on pit bulls while reviewing and revamping all of our policies relating to animal bites.

  • Tom McCartney (@TomMcCartney71)

    There is very little cost difference no matter if you have a pit bull type dog BSL Ban or not.

    There is a very impactful cost free indirect outcome as invariably the pit bull type dog owner will be far more careful and in fact go
    underground to avoid the consequences of not adhering to a BSL Ban such as fines & or losing their dog or even having it put down, this tends to focus their minds and motivates them to be in compliance.

    In effect out of sight reduces interaction with any pit bull type dogs
    in general for both the 2 & 4 legged legitimate members of the
    community which greatly increases their daily safety and dramatically reduces the possibility of pit bull attacks.

    All this at not one cent of extra cost.

    AC officers will be more available to carry out routine street and park patrols not having to deal with constant pit bull type dog mauling’s.

    This is their normal activity and will allow them to as they enforce the normal leash and dog at large laws to enforce the BSL Ban at the same time at no extra cost.

    Simple they see a pit bull type dog they pick it up, a minor cost to
    bring about increased public safety, & as they go more and more
    underground this cost will drop sharply to the level of being moot from a budget perspective.

    As well neighbors on the street will know if a pit bull type dog is
    illegally present and can call the city AC to report this allowing the
    animal to be removed, a simple, clean and efficient modality to find, fix and remove any pit bull type dog illegally in the community.

    If the owners keep their pit bull type dogs in the basement or take them out only very early in the morning or very late at night this will
    dramatically enhance the community’s safety cost free as the possibility of the public interacting with a pit bull type dog is reduced to fractionally what it normally would be the case in normal daytime hours.

    There would be no extras kenneling cost after you pick up a pit bull
    type dog, you put down a stray right away, if there is ownership proof an immediate choice is given to the owner, give it up to be put down right away or if they appeal it in the courts they pay the kenneling cost.

    If done this way the expense of kenneling is also moot.

    Done this way any Pit Bull type dog BSL Ban is easily enforceable by any community, the only requirement to make this a reality is to have the courage to simply carry out said enforcement in the face of screams, rants and raves by the pit bull advocates.

  • Tom McCartney (@TomMcCartney71)

    Springfield, MO

    In April 2008, the Springfield-Greene County Health Department released data to a local TV station – following the City of Springfield’s adoption of a 2006 pit bull ban:

    “The Springfield-Greene County Health Department reports that dog bites and vicious dog complaints are declining since the implementation of the Pit Bull Ordinance in the City of Springfield two years ago. In 2005 the health department fielded 18 vicious dog complaints, but only eight in 2007. Bites were down from 102 in 2005 to 87 in 2007.”

    “The ordinance, which requires pit bull owners to register their dogs annually, has also resulted in fewer pit bull dogs being impounded at the Springfield Animal Shelter.

    In 2005 there were 502 pit bull and pit bull mixes impounded, compared to only 252 in 2007.

    According to statistics taken from the Springfield-Greene County Health Department, as reported in the News-Leader March 12, for the three-year period beginning in 2004, there were 42 “vicious” animal attacks recorded in the jurisdiction covered.

    After passing the local ordinance banning or strictly controlling the ownership of pit bull or pit bull types, the number of attacks has dropped dramatically.

    For the five-year period from 2007-2011, there was a total of 14.

    “Because we are impounding fewer pit bulls, we’ve also seen overcrowding in our shelter subside,” says assistant director Clay Goddard. “It is the natural tendency of pit bulls to fight, so our animal control staff are forced to segregate them in individual pens.

    When we have several pit bulls in the shelter simultaneously, this severely limits space for other dogs.”
    ***************************************************
    Washington

    In 2008, the City of Wapato passed an ordinance that bans new pit bulls, rottweilers and mastiffs. Nine months after its adoption, in March 2009, Wapato Police Chief Richard Sanchez reported successful results:

    “Nine months into the ban and police calls about vicious dogs have been cut in half. The Wapato Police tell Action News they’ve gone from 18 reports in January, February and March of last year to seven so far in ’09. “Seven calls in three months… that’s nothing,” says Chief Richard Sanchez, Wapato Police Department.

    Chief Sanchez credits local cooperation for the decline of dangerous dogs.”
    ***************************************************
    Rhode Island

    When the City of Woonsocket was debating a pit bull ordinance in June 2009, the animal control supervisor in Pawtucket, John Holmes, spoke about the enormous success of Pawtucket’s 2003 pit bull ban:

    “Holmes says he predicted that it would take two years for Pawtucket to experience the full benefit of the law after it was passed, but the results were actually apparent in half the time.

    “It’s working absolutely fantastic,” said Holmes. “We have not had a pit bull maiming in the city since December of 2004.”

    Holmes says the law also capped the number of legal pit bulls in Pawtucket to about 70 animals.”

    In July 2013, Pawtucket Mayor Donald Grebien and City Council President David Moran sent a joint letter to Rhode Island Gov. Lincoln Chafee asking that he reject a statewide anti-BSL measure before him.

    While they agree that some pit bulls can make good pets, said Moran and Grebien, “the number and severity of pit bull attacks against people and other animals in the early 2000s required us to take the action we did.”

    Prior to the 2004 city ordinance, Pawtucket Animal Control officers responded to many calls about serious pit bull attacks against people and animals, according to the letter. Two of the worst cases involved a nine-month pregnant woman and a child.

    While proponents of the bill argue that breed-specific bans don’t work, said Grebien and Moran, “the results in Pawtucket dramatically prove that they do work.”

    In 2003, the year before the local ban on pit bulls went into effect, 135 pit bulls, all from Pawtucket, were taken in at the Pawtucket Animal Control Shelter for a variety of health and safety reasons, with 48 of those dogs needing to be put down.

    In 2012, 72 pit bulls were taken in, only 41 from Pawtucket, with only six needing to be euthanized, according to the two officials.
    “That’s a tremendous improvement,” they state in their letter.
    ***************************************************
    Per section 8-55 of Denvers pit bull ban:

    A pit bull, is defined as any dog that is an APBT, Am Staf Terrier, Staff Bull Terrier, or any dog displaying the majority of physical traits of anyone (1) or more of the above breeds, or any dog exhibiting those distinguishing characteristics which substantially conform to the standards set by the AKC or UKC for any of the above breed.

    Over the course of 22 years, the Denver ban has withstood numerous battles in state and federal courts. It has been used as a model for over 600 USA cities that legislate pit bulls, as well as US Navy, Air Force, Marine and Army bases ( so much for Sgt Stubby).

    without it, we’d see just what we see in Miss E’s lame replies. Every pit owner would claim their land shark was anything but a pit bull.

    Miami Dade county voted 66% to keep their pit bull ban, just as it is worded, last year.

  • Tom McCartney (@TomMcCartney71)

    In North America, from 1982-2014, Pit Bull breeds and mixes have seriously attacked 3,595 humans that resulted in 2,233 maimings and 307 deaths

    The Bullmastiff is a Pit bull type dog with the same genetic makeup and danger of a pit bull.
    The Bullmastiff was a cross of 40% Old English Bulldog or pit bull type dog and 60% English Mastiff
    In North America, from 1982-2014, Bullmastiffs have been responsible for 111 serious attacks on humans, resulting in 63 maimings and 18 deaths.

    In North America from 1982-2014, Rottweilers were responsible for 535 attacks on humans, resulting in 85 deaths.
    Rottweiler mixes were responsible for 30 attacks on humans, resulting in 4 deaths.
    ********************************************************************************
    The following is a list of the top 10 dog breeds involved in dog attacks in the U.S. and Canada involving humans from September 1982 to December 31, 2013, based on a larger table compiled by Merritt Clifton, former editor of Animal People, an animal rights charity/news group. Clifton now is the editor of Animals 24-7.

    A Bullmastiff is considered a pit bull type dog and a pit bull mix between a pit bull and a mastiff and is 40% pit bull.

    Breed ****** Attacks doing bodily harm ****** Maimed ****** Deaths
    1. Pit bull **********2792 ***********************677 **********263
    2. Rottweiler *******514 ************************294 **********81
    3. Bull Mastiff ******105 ************************61 ***********15
    4. German Shepherd 102 **********************63 ***********15
    5. Wolf Hybrid ******85 *************************49 ***********19
    6. Akita **************68 ************************50 ************8
    7. Boxer *************62 ************************29 ************7
    8. Chow *************58 ************************39 ************7
    9. Pit bull/Rottweiler mix 50 ********************15 ************15
    10.Labrador ********50 *************************39 ************3

    The report states that the numbers are compiled from press accounts dating to 1982. It only includes attacks by dogs of clearly identified breed type or ancestry, as designated by animal control officers or others with evident expertise, which have been kept as pets.

    All accounts are cross-checked by date, location and identity of the victim, according to the report.
    Attacks by police dogs, guard dogs and dogs trained specifically to fight are not included in the report.
    ********************************************************************************
    About 31,400 dogs attacked about 61,500 other animals in the U.S. in 2013, killing 43,500 and seriously injuring 18,100.

    The animals killed included about 12,000 dogs, 8,000 cats, 6,000 hooved animals, and 17,000 other small domestic animals, primarily poultry.
    The seriously injured included about 12,400 dogs, 4,000 cats, and 1,700 hooved animals. Few small mammals and poultry survived reported dog attacks.

    Pit bulls inflicted 99% of the total fatal attacks on other animals (43,000); 96% of the fatal attacks on other dogs (11,520); 95% of the fatal attacks on livestock (5,700) and on small mammals and poultry (16,150); and 94% of the fatal attacks on cats (11,280).

    About 30,000 pit bulls were involved in attacks on other animals, many of them killing multiple other animals.
    There are about 3.2 million pit bulls in the U.S. at any given time, according to the annual Animal24-7 surveys of dogs offered for sale or adoption via online classified ads.

    Thus in 2013 about one pit bull in 107 killed or seriously injured another animal, compared with about one dog in 50,000 of other breeds.
    Nationally, fatal and disfiguring attacks by dogs from shelters and rescues have exploded from zero in the first 90 years of the 20th century to 80 since 2010, including 58 by pit bulls, along with 22 fatal & disfiguring attacks by other shelter dogs, mostly Rottweilers & bull mastiffs.

    Altogether, 33 U.S. shelter dogs have participated in killing people since 2010, including 24 pit bulls, seven bull mastiffs, and two Rottweilers.
    The only dogs rehomed from U.S. shelters to kill anyone before 2000 were two wolf hybrids, rehomed in 1988 and 1989, respectively.
    ********************************************************************************
    Dog Attack Deaths and Maimings, U.S. & Canada, September 1982 to May.25, 2013.
    By compiling U.S. and Canadian press accounts between 1982 and 2013, Merritt Clifton, editor of Animal People, shows the breeds most responsible for serious injury and death.

    Study highlights
    Pit bull type dogs make up only 6% of all dogs in the USA.
    The combination of Pit Bulls, rottweilers, their close mixes and wolf hybrids and other Pit Bull Type Dogs:

    84% of attacks that induce bodily harm.

    75% of attacks to children.

    87% of attack to adults.

    72% of attacks that result in fatalities.

    80% that result in maiming
    ********************************************************************************

    Merritt Clifton Editor Of Animals24-7:

    I have logged fatal & disfiguring dog attacks in the U.S. and Canada since September 1982.

    Of the 5,314 dogs involved in fatal and disfiguring attacks on humans occurring in the U.S. & Canada since September 1982, when I began logging the data, 3,672 (68%) were pit bulls; 570 were Rottweilers; 4,524 (85%) were of related molosser breeds, including pit bulls, Rottweilers, mastiffs, bull mastiffs, boxers, and their mixes.

    Of the 594 human fatalities, 309 were killed by pit bulls; 90 were killed by Rottweilers; 442 (75%) were killed by molosser breeds.

    Of the 3,201 people who were disfigured, 2,289 (68%) were disfigured by pit bulls; 356 were disfigured by Rottweilers; 2,773 (84%) were disfigured by molosser breeds.

    Pit bulls–exclusive of their use in dogfighting–also inflict more than 70 times as many fatal and disfiguring injuries on other pets and livestock as on humans, a pattern unique to the pit bull class.

    Fatal and disfiguring attacks by dogs from shelters and rescues have exploded from zero in the first 90 years of the 20th century to 80 in the past four years, including 58 by pit bulls, along with 22 fatal & disfiguring attacks by other shelter dogs, mostly Rottweilers & bull mastiffs.

    The only dogs rehomed from U.S. shelters to kill anyone, ever, before 2000 were two wolf hybrids in 1988 and 1989. 33 U.S. shelter dogs & one U.K. shelter dog have participated in killing people since 2010, including 24 pit bulls, seven bull mastiffs, and two Rottweilers.

    Surveys of dogs offered for sale or adoption indicate that pit bulls and pit mixes are together less than 7% of the U.S. dog population; molosser breeds, all combined, are 9%.

  • Tom McCartney (@TomMcCartney71)

    My Legislation Proposal to be enacted by all states,

    cities and counties in the US & Canada.

    All Pit Bull Type Dogs must be Banned:

    Including pit bulls (American Staffordshire Terrier, Staffordshire bull terriers, American pit bull terriers, American Bulldog, Bull mastiffs, dogo argentinos, fila brasieros, presa canarios, Japanese Tosa, cane corsos and their mixes and any dog generally recognized as a pit bull or pit bull terrier and includes a dog of mixed breed with predominant pit bull or pit bull terrier characteristics)

    As well the following should be labeled as Dangerous dogs after single bite incident: rottweilers, chow chows, Doberman pinschers, German shepherds, they as well as all Grandfathered Pit Bull Type Dogs must be:

    * Licensed

    * Micro-chipped with any bite history in database for reference.

    * Insured: All dogs must be covered by mandatory liability insurance of $100,000 min. generic and $500,000 after a skin breaking bite with insurance companies based on actuarial statistic’s determining said rate.

    * All Dogs Spayed/neutered (except for limited approved show dog breeders)

    * All breeds involved in any bite incident and Grandfathered Pit Bull Type Dogs must be kenneled in a locked five-sided enclosure with concrete bottom.

    For all other dog owners language can be written that enclosure such as fences must be capable of containing your dog period, such generic language puts the onus on the owner, have the fines be so onerous that said owner will ensure this they make this so.

    1,000 the first time, double the second time and permanent confiscation the third time with a ban on said person from owning any dog within city limits, this will create an effective outcome directly or indirectly.

    * All dogs must be on leashes outside of home enclosure

    * All Grandfathered Pit Bull Type Dogs must also be muzzled outside of home enclosure

    * No transport of declared dangerous dogs for the purpose of re-homing. (Dangerous dogs must be dealt with where their history is known.)

    * All of the rules listed above also apply to rescues: rescued dogs must be licensed and subject to inspection.

    $1,000 fine for noncompliance

    Elimination of the one-bite rule in all of the 50 U.S. states

    Manslaughter charges for owner of dog that kills a human

    Felony charge for owner of dog that mauls human, dog, or other domestic animal.

  • Tom McCartney (@TomMcCartney71)

    45 People dead by dog attack in 2014

    Pit bull type dogs killed at least 37 of them directly.
    19 killed by pit bull type dogs directly of the 35 dead are children.

    Stars indicate people killed by a ‘family’ pit bull – ones that had
    been raised and cherished as an indoor pet, ‘never showed aggression
    before’, and knew the victim.

    Child fatalities by pit bull type dog (19):

    Kara E. Hartrich, 4 years old, Bloomington, Illinois. **

    Je’vaeh Maye, 2 years old, Temple Texas. **

    Braelynn Rayne Coulter, 3 years old, High Point, North Carolina. **

    Kenneth Santillan, 13 years old, Patterson, N.J. by a Bullmastiff

    Raymane Camari Robinson, 2 years old, Killeen, TX by a Bullmastiff **

    Mia Derouen, 4 years old, Houma, Louisiana **

    Christopher Malone, 3 years old, Thornton, MS **

    John Harvard, 5 year old, Riverside, AL **

    Kassi Haith, 4 years old, Felton, Del.

    Demonta Collins, 13 years old, Augusta, Georgia

    he dashed into traffic as he was running from a pit bull attacking him and was hit by a car and was killed.

    Davon Jiggetts,17 years old, Riverdale, Georgia

    he dashed into traffic as he was running from a pit bull attacking him and was hit by a car as was the pit bull, both were killed.

    Holden William Garrison-10 weeks old, Springfield Township, MI **

    Friends of family state that the dog is a Pit bull Mix a Catahoula Hound mixed with Pit Bull.

    Logan Shepard, 4 years old, Riverview, Florida **

    Jonathon Quarles Jr, 7 months old, Dayton, Ohio. **

    Joel Chirieleison, 6 years old, Fanning Springs, FL **

    Deriah Solem, 22 months, ST. Charles, Mo. **

    Javon Dade, Jr, 4 years old, Goulds, FL **

    Summer Sears, 4 years old, Tallassee, AL by Husky/German Shepard Cross

    8 year old girl, Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota by a pack of pit bull & pit bull mixes.

    Adult fatalities by pit bull type (18):

    Christina Burleson, 43 years old, Houston, Texas. **

    Klonda S. Richey, 57 years old, Dayton, Ohio. by two Bullmastiff’s

    Nancy Newberry, 77 years old, Phoenix, AZ. **

    Dorothy Hamilton, 85 years old, Kaufman, TX **

    Petra Aguirre, 83 years old, San Antonio TX **

    Betty Clark, 75 years old, San Antonio TX **

    Katie Morrison, 20-years old, Smiths Station, AL **

    Rita Pepe, 93 years old, Branford, Conn by a rescued pit bull

    Craig Sytsma, 46 years old, Metamora, Mich.2 cane corsos and Italian Pit bull type dog.

    Jessica Dawn Norman, 33-years old, Sebring, FL

    Cindy Whisman, 59 years old, Madison Township, Ohio **

    Daniel Glass, 51 years old, Lamar, Mississippi.

    Alice Payne, 75 years old, Cave City, AR. **

    Juan Fernandez, 59 years old, Modesto, CA

    Alemeaner Dial, 83 YEARS OLD, Robeson County, N.C. **

    Rita Woodard, 64 years old, Corpus Christi. TX **

    Edward Cahill, 40 years old, Portage, IND **

    Deanne Lynn Coando 40 years old, Wind River Indian Reservation in Wyoming
    by a pack of pit bull & pit bull mixes.

    That’s 82% killed by attacking pit bull type dogs.

    Pit Bull type dogs are only about 6% of the entire dog population..

    Stella Antanaitis, 91 years old, Stamford, CT, Keeshond mix **

    Bobbie Cheveallier, 85 years old, Pollock, LA by a northern breed dog or mix.

    Jose Robles, 62 Years old, Madison, NC 15 free-roaming heelers and hound mixes.

    Nyhiem Wilfong, 1 year old, Caldwell County, N.C. by Rottweiler. **

    89-year-old Annabell Martin, Corona, CA. by her grandson’s three Rottweilers.**

    7 years old, Logan Meyer, Hustisford, WI by a Rottweiler. **

    Christopher Camejo Jr., 2-years old, Crystal River, FL by 4 Rottweiler’s **

    Non-bite fatalities:

    Carlos Eligio Trevina – 54 y.o. – Idaho Falls ID ** – [Jan 9] – Died of a heart attack immediately after breaking up a fight between his seven pit bulls / pit mixes

    *******************************************************************

    33 People dead by dog attack in 2013.

    Pit bull type dogs killed thirty of them. sixteen of the twenty-nine dead are children.

    Stars indicate people killed by a ‘family’ pit bull – ones that had been raised and cherished as an indoor pet, ‘never showed aggression before’, and knew the victim.

    Child fatalities by pit bull type dog (16):

    Christian Gormanous – 4 yrs old Montgomery County, TX

    Isaiah Aguilar – 2 yrs old Sabinal, TX

    Ryan Maxwell – 7 yrs old ** Galesburg, IL.

    Dax Borchardt – 14 mos old ** Walworth, WI.

    Monica Laminack – 21 mos old ** Ellabelle, GA.

    Tyler Jett – 7 yrs old Callaway, FL.

    Jordyn Arndt – 4 yrs old ** Prairie City, IA.

    Beau Rutledge – 2 yrs old ** Fulton County, GA.

    Ayden Evans- 5 yrs old ** Jessieville, AR.

    Nephi Selu – 6 yrs old ** Union City, CA.

    Arianna Jolee Merrbach – 5 yrs old Effingham, SC.

    Daniel (surname as yet not revealed) – 2 yrs old (Gilbert, Arizona) **

    Samuel Eli Zamudio – 2 yrs old** Colton, CA

    Jordan Ryan– 5 yrs old Baker city, Oregon

    Levi Watson-Bradford-4 years old** White County, Arkansas

    Jah’niyah White – 2 years old ** Chicago, Ill

    Adult fatalities by pit bull type (13):

    Betty Todd – 65 yrs old ** Hodges, SC

    Elsie Grace – 91 yrs old ** Hemet, CA

    Claudia Gallardo – 38 yrs old Stockton, CA.

    Pamela Devitt – 63 yrs old Littlerock, CA.

    Carlton Freeman – 80 yrs old Harleyville, SC.

    Linda Oliver – 63 yrs old Dayton, TX.

    James Harding – 62 yrs old -Baltimore, MD

    chased into traffic by two attacking pit bulls

    Juan Campos – 96 yrs old Katy, Texas.

    Terry Douglass 56 years old. **Baltimore, MD

    Katherine Atkins-25 years old ** Kernersville, NC

    Nga Woodhead-65 years old Spanaway, WA.

    Joan Kappen, 75 years old Hot Springs Ark

    Michal Nelson, 41 years old Valencia County, New Mexico **

    (1 non-pit type killing) [Rachel Honabarger – 35 yrs old – mauled to death by her own GSD mix] Coshocton, OH.

    (1 husky-mix killing, unknown if the other half of the dog was pit bull) [Jordan Lee Reed – 5 yrs old] Kotzebue, AK

    (1 Shiba Inu killing) Mia Gibson – age 3 months, of Gibson, OH – mauled to death by family Shiba Inu.

    Three of the pit bull type dogs were BULL mastiffs, ie 40% pit-fighting bulldog.

    If 27 of 33 dead were killed by pit bull attack, that’s 82% dead by pit attack, 9% dead by ‘molosser’, 3% by some kind of GSD mix, 3% by a husky + possibly pit mix, 3% by Shiba Inu.

    If you count the pit-mix mastiffs as pit bull types, that’s 91% killed by attacking pit bull types. Pit types are only about 6% of the entire dog population.

    The man who ran into traffic kept pit bulls himself. He knew perfectly well what the two stranger pit bulls that were chasing him would do if they caught him, so he preferred to risk a swift death by oncoming car.

  • Tom McCartney (@TomMcCartney71)

    12 dead by dog attack in the US so far in 2015.
    9 killed by known pit bull type dogs / pit bull mixes, which include
    so-called ‘breeds’ like bullmastiffs and American Bulldogs.

    Stars (**) indicate that the killer was someone’s beloved family pit bull that was never abused or neglected.
    The double dagger (‡) indicates that the ‘pet’ pit bull belonged to the deceased person, their family or a relative.

    Adult fatalities by pit bull type dog (6):
    Kenneth Ford, 79 years old, Pahrump, Nev., March.13

    Eugene Smith – 87 y.o. – Frederick MD ** ‡ [January 7; ‘rescue’ pit bull, kept as indoor family pet]

    Fredrick Crutchfield, 63 years old, Coal Hill, Arkansas ** ‡ Feb.4th

    Roy Higgenbotham Jr., 62 years old, Wheeling, West Virginia ** March.9th
    by Friends Pit Bull

    Julia Charging Whirlwind, 49 years old, White River, SD by Pack of Pit Bull dogs, March.14th, Native American on Rosebud Reservation.

    De’trick O. Johnson, 36 years old, Pine Bluff, Ark, March.21, by a pack of pit bull type dogs.

    Child fatalities by pit bull type dog (3):
    Declan Dean Moss – 18 mos. Old – Brooksville, FL ** ‡ [January 19, mother’s pit bulls]

    Malaki Mildward — 7 years old — College Springs, Iowa ** ‡ (January.22) 2 Pit Bull Mixes, Mother’s & friends Pit bulls.

    Taylynn Devaughnm 2 years old, West Mifflin, PA ** ‡ Feb.22 Aunt’s Pit Bull Mix

    Fatalities by ‘breed unknown’ (1)

    Neta Lee Adams, 81 years old, Washington County, GA Mar 31, 2015

    Unidentified Native American – about 40 y,o. – Gallup, NM [January 2
    [found dead at the roadside after altercation with ‘feral dogs’]

    Fatalities by ‘other breed’s’ (1)

    Betty Wood, 78 years old, Sulphur Springs, TX ** ‡ March.13,2015 by her pet Rottweiler

    Foreign deaths by pit bull type dog that we know of (3):
    Children (2)
    Michel Danny Kasouha, 7 years old, Beirut, Leabanon, April.7,2014
    Maxi Millian Guscott – 2 y.o. – St. Ann, Jamaica ** ‡ [January 2 – bullmastiff, which is a pit bull – mastiff mix]

    Adult (1)

    Emilia Mitroi, 53 years old, Drobeta Turnu Severin, Romania ** ‡ Pit Bull Terrier, March.9th.

  • Tom McCartney (@TomMcCartney71)

    How many other animals did pit bulls kill in 2014?

    Fifty thousand dogs per year, including at least 34,250 pit bulls,
    attack other animals, according to ANIMALS 24-7 analysis of dog attack
    data from 2013-2014.

    Of the 82,000 animal victims per year,
    59,000 die; 23,000 survive their injuries. Among the dead are 15,500
    dogs, 95% of them attacked by pit bulls, and 6,000 hooved animals, 93%
    of them attacked by pit bulls.

    Pit bulls also inflict at least
    60% of the 29,000 fatal attacks on domestic birds and small mammals, and
    at least 60% of the 8,250 fatal attacks on cats. About a third of the
    fatal dog attacks on domestic birds, small mammals, and cats are by dogs
    who are not caught and identified, so might also include many pit
    bulls.
    ****************************************************************************
    Two years of quantification

    This data has emerged from more than two years of systematic effort to
    quantify how many other dogs, cats, livestock, and other domestic
    animals are victims of dog attacks.

    117,515 animals killed by dogs in 2013-2014;

    Rounding off the numbers to the nearest five, about 99,750 dogs
    attacked about 164,240 other animals in the U.S. in 2013-2014, killing
    117,515 and seriously injuring 46,725.

    The animals killed
    included about 31,000 dogs, 16,500 cats, 11,885 hooved animals, and
    57,240 other small domestic animals, primarily poultry.

    The
    seriously injured included about 24,325 dogs, 5,216 cats, and 3,715
    hooved animals. Few small mammals and poultry survived reported dog
    attacks.

    Pit bulls committed more than 60% of fatal attacks

    Pit bulls appear to have inflicted not less than 60% of the total fatal
    attacks on animals (68,500), and probably considerably more, since
    pit bulls might also have inflicted a significant share of the 49,000
    fatalities on other animals in cases where the attacking dogs were not
    identified.

    Altogether, pit bulls inflicted 95% of the fatal
    attacks on other dogs (30,466); 93% of the fatal attacks on livestock
    (10,583); 95% of the fatal attacks on small mammals and poultry
    (56,400); and at least 61% of the fatal attacks on cats (21,226), of
    which 35% involved unidentified dogs.

    About 90,000 pit bulls were
    involved in attacks on other animals in 2013-2014: more than 90% of all
    the dogs inflicting attacks who were identified by breed.

    There are about 3.5 million pit bulls in the U.S. at any given time, according
    to the my annual surveys of dogs offered for sale or adoption via
    online classified ads.

    (See “Large retrievers still nearly twice as popular as pit bulls,” http://wp.me/p4pKmM-BA.)

    Thus in 2013-2014 more than one pit bull in 40 killed or seriously
    injured another animal, compared with about one dog in 50,000 of

    Taking into account the increase in the U.S. pit bull population over
    the past decade, and the resultant surge in dog attacks on other
    animals, my findings are reasonably consistent with USDA Wildlife
    Services estimates published in 2006.

  • Marc Brown

    The pit bull fanatics routinely put up ‘Justice For [fill in a pit bull name]’ pages when someone stabs a pit bull to save their own normal dog from the pit bull killing it. They massively stalk the person, contact their employer and try to get them fired, send hate messages and death threats. What are the pit bull fanatics going to do now? — now that someone stabbed a vicious pit bull to save another vicious pit bull?

    • Lloyd

      We are going to feel compassion for a dog owner who had to make a terrible decision in order to save one of his dogs even though he apparently was doing everything right to keep the dogs separated.

      This isn’t a pit bull issues. Housemate dogs can and do very often reach a point where they can’t be around each other. It can happen with any breed.

  • Jo Anna Lindorff

    First off Pit Bulls were really bread to be nanny dogs. So where they got their aggressive behavior is really anyone’s guess; but they have been really wired to be one of the best kind of dogs out there too. But yes, ANY ANIMAL can snap and attack humans… look at it it this way, we domesticated cats to be pets, when they are really wild in their natural born lives. Animals will always have the wild instincts in them no matter how far we try and take it out of them. They are in a way just like humans; when we are pushed to our breaking point we snap too. SO DO ANIMALS.

    • C'MON JO ANNA LINDORFF

      Google “what were pitbulls originally bred for”. “Today’s pit bull is a descendant of the original English bull-baiting dog—a dog that was bred to bite and hold bulls, bears and other large animals around the face and head.”

      Where in the world did you ever come up with the mistake idea that pit bulls were bred as nanny dogs? Sheesh!!

    • sosfdavido

      Pit bulls were bred to kill bulls. In pits, during contests. They were NEVER Nanny Dogs. Sure, you can find vintage pics of kids and pit bull type dogs but you can find vintage pics of kids and lions, tigers and bears, too.

  • AJM

    WOW. Tom has a lot of time on his hands.
    All I can say is its more the owner then the bread I know some wonderful Pits and some mean labs. My friends lab has attacked 3 dogs and never been reported. I was bit by a beagle and my sister a shar pei, my friend was bit by a golden retriever and my dog was attacked by a different golden retriever. I love how Pits are the only one classified by mixes, if they have pit in them they are a pit mix, what about the other bread. The study I want to see is one on the owners of pits. I went to adopt a pit puppy and the lady’s “family” pit was raised to be aggressive. She loved it that way, made her feel tough I guess. Well needless to say I did not adopt from her. I think she should be banned from owning and the pit fixed but animal control does not care until they attack. If you read the report It sounds like they were not good owners, their dogs were not trained or socialized. I’m sorry that people hate an animal just by its bread but they probably live by bad owners. People who typically own pits want aggressive dogs and train them to be that way, even their “family” dogs. I do own a pit and she has never, barked, growled, snapped or done anything aggressive. Well she does like to attack bugs. She does not chase cats, even though we don’t have one. She does not even chase birds and my blue heeler loved to kill birds and rodents. My neighbors chiwawa’s dogs love to come in my back yard, my dogs has never done anything aggressive towards them even in her territory. the Chiwawa’s will bark and bite at anyone around them especially children. My dog loves children and they climb all over her, pits were nanny dogs and it was because they are very patient with children. You can own a good pit or a bad lab I promise. I have trained and socialized my dog from the day I got her. I play with her food and toys so she does not get possessive we go to the dog park all the time. She is one of the favorite dogs in our neighborhood because how gentle she is with kids. She loves to let them chase her or play fetch with her.
    I know its a dog but this is the same as racism was back in the day, a pit can never be trusted just because its a pit not because of the way it was raised.
    I know people will hate me for this but I don’t know how you can get mad what your cat dies in someone else’s back yard. I know the roam free but I’m sorry I cant be responsible for your cat. Again I have never owned a dog that has killed one.
    Pits are good therapy dogs and I will bet you all right now my PIT is probably better behaved then most if not all of your dogs. I have never trusted any dog regardless of bread alone with children and I never will.

  • Lloyd

    If you for one second believe that these were the only two dogs in the US yesterday that share a common home that would fight to the death if they got close enough and that only pit bulls are capable of this, you are 100% delusional and know nothing about dogs.

    There are dog owners all over the country who have dogs that are wonderful around family, people and sometimes even dogs they aren’t housed with, that have to be crated and rotated with their housemate dog because the dogs simply don’t get along.

    Once two dogs have a serious altercation with each other, it can be extremely difficult if not impossible to bring them together safely.

    Any breed is capable of this behavior. I know because I have a lab who has to be separated from her housemate because she instigates brawls with him (he’s a pit bull incidentally and he’s a total wuss) vicious enough to send him to the vet that take two adults to stop.

    She’s a lover of people and is fairly dog social with other dogs and we’re working on getting them re-introduced.

    This is a non-story.

  • Merese

    I had two Huskys at one time years ago. They got in few scraps and all I had to do was yell at them and they stopped. If the teen was not home, the aggressive pitbull would of killed the other one, and heart attacks have happened when owners over work themselves trying to get these powerful animals off a person or pet. If you have to kill a dog to get it to stop, it is a dangerous animal, not a pet.

  • CA Shutterbug

    The safety of communities across the nation are being threatened by a system that fails to be pro-active, definitive, and consistent in handling of dog attacks.

    People across the nation, including elderly and children are being mauled, injured, and killed. Survivors are left with financial burdens.

    We need:
    1. Stricter legislation, and criminal
    prosecution in serious cases with gross negligence.

    2. Mandatory liability insurance for owners of large and
    powerful dog breeds.

    3. Ban unlicensed backyard breeding of Pitbulls and Guard-dog
    breeds with a quantifiable history of attacks.

    4. Mandatory immediate confiscation of unlicensed and unvaccinated dogs.

    5. Mandatory euthanization of dogs that kill or maul a human being, or kill another domesticated animal.

    Write your Governors and Senators, and ask them to protect our families and children. Ask them for these 5 points.

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