What’s the science behind campaign signs?

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LINDON, Utah -- With just a week to the election, you can't help be see the clutter of campaign signs on the roadway.

Experts say there’s a science behind the signs that make some more effective than others.

“When people are driving by depending on where the sign is put, we want them to sight read it,” said Ronn Raymond, owner of Graphik Display & Sign “We don't want them to try to read it, but make it so they can't help but read it.”

The experts say there's a fine line between style and readability and contrast is everything.

Traditionally, candidates stick with party colors, but with more independents the sign makers are starting to see success on different ends of the color spectrum.

“I know a lot of people use the red, white and blue, but sometimes it's the other colors that really catch people's attention,” said Wes Raymond co-owner of Graphik Display & Sign.

Graphic designers say green signs blend in with grass and bushes, neon means you're trying too hard, and as for font color -- stick with white.

And finally when it comes to political signs, they say, bigger is usually better.

“If it's a big street a broad street you've got to go large, really it's never too large,” Raymond said.

And of course, the marketers think the more signs candidates buy the better the odds of being seen and ultimately coming out on top on Election Day.