Program traps cats to control feral feline populations as part of no-kill initiative

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SALT LAKE CITY – Stray cats can be a nuisance, but a group of Utahns are working to control feral cat populations through means other than putting the animals down.

Best Friends Animal Society is trapping feral cats, but they are caging the animals for a good cause.

The cats live in colonies of three to 30, and the cats captured are spayed and neutered before they are brought back.

"Community cats covers a fairly large scale of cats,” said Jessica Vigos, who is the Community Cat Coordinator. “It can be anything from owned pets that have been abandoned or left, to very untame cats.”

Clyde Daines works at a clinic that does spaying and neutering and spoke about the importance of the procedure in controlling cat communities.

“Cats multiply so fast," he said. "Female cats have a litter, six, seven, eight kittens; those kittens will be breeding in six months."

Jessica Vigos, Community Cat Coordinator, said it’s an ongoing process.

"It is monitoring the colony and reducing the numbers over time,” she said. “It doesn't happen overnight. But over time, that colony will be reduced because there's no more kittens being brought into the colony.”

Daines estimates that the program has fixed 4,000 cats since it started, not all of which were feral.

"Overpopulation in any of the animal situations, in the ferals, in the shelters: It's just a real problem,” Daines said.

Vigos said the procedure helps in other ways as well.

"Many of the behaviors that cats exhibit that are unfixed are spraying, yowling, fighting; they're actually much healthier once they're fixed,” Vigos said.

The Best Friends Animal Society is seeking volunteers to help with the Community Cats program, click here for details.

34 comments

    • slcnewbie

      The healthy ones are usually returned to the colony. If they are tame they are often put up for adoption. Ones that are very ill are humanely euthanized.

  • MM

    TNR is not effective as a population reduction tool, is a scourge on native wildlife, a risk to public health and an infringement on property rights. Not humane for domestic animals either.

    • Jessica

      Actually the data we have suggests that it is a very effective reduction in population. The methods used over the last 80 years of rounding up animals and killing them has been a complete failure in reducing populations. Even looking at our local shelters, the ones that have been actively participating in TNR the reduction in the number of cats coming to the shelter after two years is a remarkable reduction. Scourge on native wildlife? Actually if you look into this cat populations are a small percentage of many other factors that effect wildlife populations, pesticides, diseases, loss of food sources, climate change all are huge factors in the loss of wildlife. A risk to public health? These cats are actually given a rabies shot and sometimes other vaccinations making TNR a huge plus for not putting public health at risk. So it is humane to round up cats and kill them because their home is the community?? Whats not humane is to round up cats, deem the fractious because they hiss or swat (education on cat behavior is MUCH NEEDED) and then kill them. A cat has a better chance at finding a home living outside than a cat does that enters the shelter system, especially in place who aren’t so lucky as to have the programs starting to happen to help cats. 71% of the animals euthanized in this country are cats, the national average of ones reclaimed from shelters is approx. 7%. Most place have approx. at 30% save rate for cats….I think that’s pretty inhumane.

      • MM

        Jessica, clearly you have not read any of the current published research on this subject. Either that, or as many TNR advocates do, you choose to ignore the results. Whose data? Suggest whatever the heck you like. When that data is published in a peer-reviewed relevant journal, let me know, okay? Even the AVMA has noted in their position statement that TNR is statistically insignificant in reducing the number of feral cats through these programs. Very effective? Come on already. Where are the now eliminated colonies? What metrics are there to measure such outcomes? There is NO geographical area, not a zip code, city, county or state that has shown an actual reduction in the overall population of feral cats. Intake numbers are meaningless. Of course, there are lower intakes! The cats are getting re-routed to TNR programs and re-dumped! Again, thanks goes to BFAS for that terrible state legislation passed a few years ago that lets feral cats by-pass the holding period. What you write is nothing but a big load of bull cookies.

        Cats are NOT a small percentage. They are the LEADING direct human cause of wildlife mortality. Because you don’t like the results of peer-reviewed research does not change reality. Cats kill billions of animals each year, now more than window strikes. Everyone in related fields knows that habitat loss is the biggest challenge wildlife faces. Cats are a close second or third nowadays. Again, read Loss et al 2013 and other papers substantiating this.

        What do you have? Data. Nice. Again, publish something worthwhile instead of spreading propaganda.

        As for public health, should I listen to you or to the authors of Roebling et al 2013? Four of them are from the CDC. Gee, tough choice. TNR supporter or CDC? This decision may take a while…

        A lethal injection is a far kinder fate than what happens to most outdoor cats, managed or not. And what is not humane is what those cats do to the wildlife that is needlessly tortured and killed. Shame on BFAS.

        If euthanasia is so unpalatable, then contain the cats and suggest others do the same.

        TENVAC is a real win-win for everyone – not ‘cat-centric’ like TNR.

  • thanksfornothing

    Where they decimate local wildlife that haven’t evolved the capacity to defend themselves against introduced predators. As native species (like songbirds) disappear, be sure to thank Best Friends Animal Society. Really, they should just call themselves Best Friends Feral Cat Society.

    • jessyv74

      Actually the data we have suggests that it is a very effective reduction in population. The methods used over the last 80 years of rounding up animals and killing them has been a complete failure in reducing populations. Even looking at our local shelters, the ones that have been actively participating in TNR the reduction in the number of cats coming to the shelter after two years is a remarkable reduction. Scourge on native wildlife? Actually if you look into this cat populations are a small percentage of many other factors that effect wildlife populations, pesticides, diseases, loss of food sources, climate change all are huge factors in the loss of wildlife. A risk to public health? These cats are actually given a rabies shot and sometimes other vaccinations making TNR a huge plus for not putting public health at risk. So it is humane to round up cats and kill them because their home is the community?? Whats not humane is to round up cats, deem the fractious because they hiss or swat (education on cat behavior is MUCH NEEDED) and then kill them. A cat has a better chance at finding a home living outside than a cat does that enters the shelter system, especially in place who aren’t so lucky as to have the programs starting to happen to help cats. 71% of the animals euthanized in this country are cats, the national average of ones reclaimed from shelters is approx. 7%. Most place have approx. at 30% save rate for cats….I think that’s pretty inhumane.

      • MM

        Jessica, clearly you have not read any of the current published research on this subject. Either that, or as many TNR advocates do, you choose to ignore the results. Whose data? Suggest whatever the heck you like. When that data is published in a peer-reviewed relevant journal, let me know, okay? Even the AVMA has noted in their position statement that TNR is statistically insignificant in reducing the number of feral cats through these programs. Very effective? Come on already. Where are the now eliminated colonies? What metrics are there to measure such outcomes? There is NO geographical area, not a zip code, city, county or state that has shown an actual reduction in the overall population of feral cats. Intake numbers are meaningless. Of course, there are lower intakes! The cats are getting re-routed to TNR programs and re-dumped! Again, thanks goes to BFAS for that terrible state legislation passed a few years ago that lets feral cats by-pass the holding period. What you write is nothing but a big load of bull cookies.

        Cats are NOT a small percentage. They are the LEADING direct human cause of wildlife mortality. Because you don’t like the results of peer-reviewed research does not change reality. Cats kill billions of animals each year, now more than window strikes. Everyone in related fields knows that habitat loss is the biggest challenge wildlife faces. Cats are a close second or third nowadays. Again, read Loss et al 2013 and other papers substantiating this.

        What do you have? Data. Nice. Again, publish something worthwhile instead of spreading propaganda.

        As for public health, should I listen to you or to the authors of Roebling et al 2013? Four of them are from the CDC. Gee, tough choice. TNR supporter or CDC? This decision may take a while…

        A lethal injection is a far kinder fate than what happens to most outdoor cats, managed or not. And what is not humane is what those cats do to the wildlife that is needlessly tortured and killed. Shame on BFAS.

        If euthanasia is so unpalatable, then contain the cats and suggest others do the same.

        TENVAC is a real win-win for everyone – not ‘cat-centric’ like TNR.

  • Ashley

    Actually the goal is less outside cats, less cats outside to cause issues for birds and nuisances for people. The whole point is to emphasize that removing the cats does not solve the cat population. A managed TNR program reduces cat numbers and is more effective than trap and euthanize.

    • MM

      An unattainable goal through this method. Fewer cats would be less problematic for wildlife. But TNR does not do that. Read Andersen et al 2004. Both removal and TNR require ongoing management. There is plenty of immigration in TNR due to that food source. Colonies do not get eliminated, they rarely stabilize, and often grow. Today, thanks to BFAS and their “community cat’ management programs, even friendly cats are dumped back outside. Through Return to Field programs and Shelter Neuter Return programs, the country is just saturated with cats. There is no peer reviewed science indicating that TNR works as a population reduction tool. Removal at least provides respite to neighbors and can make the difference in breeding and residential wildlife. The only thing TNR does is come at the expense of everything else for a self-serving goal of ‘saving’ the cats and any and all costs.

      • jessyv74

        Clearly you did not read the data from 8 different peer reviewed journals i posted the link too. journals stating scientific studies. Follow the link there’s your peer reviewed data of which there’s is plenty of data for and against . You are not well informed about what you are saying but believe whatever you want because really my goal is to help cats. What are you doing to help? Lethal injection is a method not even used by many shelters, go ahead and do your homework on gassing and heart stick. Clearly your opinion is that if someone who is not involved in the actual work being done to help control populations while reducing the numbers of animals being killed. I’m going to move forward and know that I was part of the change not part of old paradigms that don’t work. Yes I am an animal advocate and proud of it!

      • MM

        Jessica, I have read most of the studies on this topic. Have you? Or do you just copy and paste links? Did you go to the other link that posts responses to those studies you mentioned? I am more than well-informed Jessica AND I have rescued a lot of cats in my day. If shelters are not killing animals humanely, that is another issue that should be addressed and entirely separate from discussions about cat impact on wildlife, public health risk, and effectiveness of TNR. That is not a reason to re-dump animals. The fact is, a number of TNR advocates simply cannot accept the truth, nor can they accept the fact that there are thousands of people who love cats, rescue cats, or own cats and do not believe for a second that TNR is the solution.

        Sadly, no, you are part of the problem.

      • Myra

        You are just an angry troll. This was a positive story Fox 13 wanted to do to show what Best Friends does to help cats. The advocates here are trying to help a problem that the community created. This is what happens when people don’t fix their pets or abandon them, as a result they can grow exponentially. In a perfect world, all cats would have loving homes with owners who take great care of them. Unfortunately, we still have those who do not fix their pets or dump them off thinking “oh they’ll be fine”. The cats are going to be in communities, so they may as well be fixed so they are not increasing in number. Cats are not the same as dogs, they have completely different behaviors. Actually many of the current city laws state that cats cannot be free-roaming and if they are that is basis for them to be taken to the shelter. Once a cat enters a shelter often their chances of leaving alive are slim. This causes more money for the city to endlessly kill cats. The cat that was killed yesterday, will immediately be replaced with a litter of 6 kittens the next day. If you ask most people, they think this is wrong, so much that they are willing to donate toward causes to help the animals. Every life should have a chance to live the best life possible.

      • MM

        Sticks and stones Myra…

        Yes, I am so very sorry to shed some light onto a ‘feel good’ story that neglects to expose the realities of TNR.

        And why do you think society places such little value on their cats? There was a study done recently that showed that owned cats do not even go for wellness exams as often as dogs do. Again, we will never change irresponsible pet ownership by treating cats like some form of biological trash. And that is exactly what TNR does. Any veterinarian in his or her right mind would NEVER say to a client of an owned pet… oh well, if your cat eats every other day, that is okay, and if the cat only comes into the office once her whole life that is okay, and if she receives just one shot her whole life, that is okay, and if she uses that old igloo with the straw inside for shelter that is okay, and if you can’t really bring her in even though she has that abscess, well, that is okay. No, that would be cruel and criminal for OWNED pets, but fine because the cat is feral? Hog-freaking-wash.

        Cats are domestic companion animals like dogs. We don’t let dogs or ferrets or pet birds or pet reptiles or any other domestic animal run wild. Cats are no exception.

        Did you ask ‘most people’ if they want to live next door to 20 free-roaming cats? THAT is the question to ask. On the island of Hawaii, where things have gotten so very bad, a survey was done, and you know what? The majority of people voted TNR the least favorable method out of 7… and that even included sharpshooters!

  • Elise

    Irresponsible people are the root of the problem here! Cats have just as much right to live as the aforementioned wildlife. Humans trump feral cats in destroying wildlife habitats far more than they like to admit. Community Cats are a community issue. It’s not their fault the were born in the streets- it’s the irresponsible human’s faults. Trap Neuter Return has proven to be effective over trap and kill. TNR reduces shelter intake as well as new kittens being added to the existing population. It’s simple, spay/neuter and you won’t have the problem at all. Knowledge is power.

    • MM

      Rights are human entitlements. This is about the welfare of animals. Natural resources should be the priority. Cats can live – tame them and find them homes, or properly contain them through TENVAC programs. Humans allow their pets to roam, humans abandon their animals, and humans re-abandon them through TNR. Cats are the single greatest direct human caused threat to wildlife. We will never get people to be responsible for their animals by condoning outdoor lives and deaths for domestic animals through TNR. If knowledge is power, then try reading some science. You did nothing to substantiate your claim. Loss et al 2013, Roebling et al 2013, Longcore et al 2009, Gerhold & Jessup 2012.

      • jessyv74

        Tame them up? So do we kill all the wildlife or tame them up? With effective TNR programs, cats who were once pets can be evaluated and re-homed IF WE HAD PROGRAMS THAT SUPPORTED THAT! Your data is bias. In the several decades that we have been rounding them up and killing them has that helped people take accountability? No out of site out of mind, quite possibly TNR would be the most effective way to entice responsible owners as the problems doesn’t just get to disappear. Here are the facts that give the numbers you request and the sources are cited. * studies with a link to each one… http://www.alleycat.org/tnrstudies

    • MM

      Why are you talking about killing or taming wildlife? Re-homing cats is fine and can be done without TNR. You seriously do not understand peer review. What exactly is biased? I gave you several citations for papers that have been published in related fields that are peer-reviewed. Cats have not been treated as dogs and that is the problem. Not the fact that cats have died in shelters. Ordinances should be in place that license cats and prohibit them from roaming. We do not typically have a stray dog problem in this country because we did go through a time in which dogs were rounded up. In 2007 the CDC announced that canine rabies had been eliminated from the US through licensing, vaccination and stray dog CONTROL – not by TNR’ing packs of dogs! And now, cats are the leading domestic animal carrier of rabies. Time to put good laws into place and stop this TNR nonsense.

      Do you have any idea what you wrote? So, are cats in the face of people a better solution? No out of sight/out of mind in TNR FOR SURE. Cats are forced upon neighbors all too often who don’t want them.

      • jessyv74

        Your the one that said “tame them up” true feral cats are wild and can not be tamed up. There home is the community. Shall we start catching raccoons and taming them up or killing them.? “removal gives neighbors reprise” actually when you remove members of a colony , the vaccum effect happens creating more cats to move in and more breeding to make up for lost members. “leading cause of rabies” no actually dogs and cats account for less than 5% of rabies cases. bats are actually the leading cause of rabies in the US and you can get that info directly from the CDC. the data you are citing is old and outdated first off. you very clearly do not know about current data, or the behaviors of cats. 2004 was actually 10 years ago. 2007 not much better. “Typically not a stray dog problem” how about you spend some time in a shelter and rethink that.”cats being forced upon people” are cats being forced on you? We can talk about some great deterants. Birds are forced on people too shall we kill them for entering people yards? I try to help birds too! i have feeders, decals on my windows…I mean really a lot of the things you are saying just show that their needs to be more education, more tolerance of other life and more correct information available to the public. Cats should absolutely not be treated like dogs they are a completely different species and are very different. The behaviors of cats and dogs are completely different. yes tame cats should be in homes, we do evaluate them, and the more programs that are supported for cats the more shelters will learn about cat behaviors and have the ability to evaluate them. How about you listen to the local shelters about how effective TNR programs have been? It is very obvious you do not like cats but how do you care for one animal and hate another? I am not content with killing any animal just because it is homeless. In 80 yrs of doing the same thing has it reduced populations? No. I believe there are far more people advocating, working and pushing for proper TNR due to the fact they have actually worked in the field. “Re-dumping them” many of them were never dumped. Cats account for approx. 10% of bird deaths, so what about the 90% of that equation??? 10% is a very small percentage of that number….are you wanting to save other small mammals from the cats?

      • MM

        Yes, tame or socialize feral cats – it can be done more often than not. Feral cats, true feral cats, are STILL domestic cats, they are not wild cats. Wild cats are panthers and bobcats and ocelots and so forth, not Felis catus. Take a basic ecology course for crying out loud. The domestic cat has NO ecological niche, no native habitat in any North America ecosystem. Their home is NOT outdoors. The homes of wild animals ARE outdoors. Why is that so hard to understand? And, fyi, people remove ‘nuisance’ wildlife all the time. Sure, we try to encourage co-existing BECAUSE the wildlife belongs in the wild – not domestic cats.

        The vacuum effect is simply immigration and happens all the time in TNR thanks to the food source and the inability to trap a high enough percentage of cats.
        Try reading my post again. Cats are the leading DOMESTIC animal carrier of rabies. And those food stations certainly don’t help do anything but to increase and artificially inflate the number of wild mesopredators like raccoons and skunks, which are also carriers of rabies.

        Uh, 2013 is last year. Again, read Roebling et al 2013. On the website of abcbirds.org

        Where did I write 2004? 2007 referred to an announcement about canine rabies.

        By stray dog problem I mean packs of free-roaming dogs. We don’t have a dog problem like we do a cat problem. There are isolated places where there is a problem, like the City of Detroit, for example, but generally speaking, there is not a problem. Pitbull breeds are filling shelters, yes, but there are many shelters across the states that are importing dogs and puppies from other places. That sure doesn’t happen with cats.

        Those deterrents don’t work and you place the burden on the property owner by suggesting that.

        And exactly how are birds forced on people? Somehow you don’t seem to understand that wildlife does indeed live outside. And boy I hope you are not feeding cats in your yard if you feed birds. Why invite those birds to their last supper?

        The bottom line is y’all want cats treated as if they are protected wildlife. Yet, don’t treat them as we do other wild mammals, which we hunt. Yet, feed the cats in groups of who knows how many. Have your cake and eat it too, while pissing off the neighbors. TNR is outdoor cat hoarding.

        Listen to local shelters? Uh no, I read the science, thanks anyway. Yes, indeed, let me go to a TNR advocate for information about cat impact on wildlife while I am at it. Maybe next time I need a health check up I’ll go to a plumber. Or maybe when the roof needs repair I can call my local master gardener…

        You are so meowing up the wrong tree. I love cats, which is PRECISELY why I would never dump them outside again through TNR. Your ridiculous presumptions aside, this is about world view -and yours focuses on cats, so much so, ya can’t see anything else.

        Not content on killing an animal you say? No, not you. But you are, sadly, perfectly content releasing that one, now sterilized cat, who will inevitably kill dozens if not hundreds or more wild critters during the course of her life time outdoors. Well, bravo to you. Now, that wasn’t self-serving at all. smh

      • jessyv74

        It’s nice you read scientific papers unfortunately there is the real world and real facts not based on theory and controlled studies. You are misinformed about community cats. There is a broad range . Maybe you’d like to be part of the solution? Apparently taming up wild cats? Check the definitions of what a true feral is. As all people quoting bird studies you are taking an extreme case and making it the norm. The 20 or more cats is not the norm, not to mention we did not make those situations we are addressing them. I do feed many birds and love them, my cats are indoor cats.. If you knew much at all about cats you would know that out of owned cats only about 47% actually hunt and its for sport. I spend plenty of play time with my cats, they enjoy the sun when in the garden with me. It would be ideal if all cats could be indoor cats but that is not the reality. With community cats providing s/n, vaccines, food, water addresses many of your stated issues. yes there is maintenance required…so “it doesn’t reduce populations” well no one needs to be a genius to figure out obviously if babies are not coming in numbers in colonies will not grow, maybe thats a new kind of math? Your argument is clear to you..I’m going to carry on with what i do! Thank you for your opinion.

      • MM

        Jess you do not need to be a genius, but you do need a basic understanding of science. Science is the best and most accurate way to draw conclusions about the real world based on accurately collected data. You have made claims and provided percentages, yet you cite nothing to substantiate what you wrote. There is no credence in that. I don’t need to check any definitions, but you could stand to read a robust paper like Loss et al 2013 to gain at least some understanding of the fact that billions of animals are dying as a result of outdoor cats.

        Extreme? Uh no. A lot of the colonies are actually quite bigger than 20. And really, for a property owner who does not want cats roaming on his/her property, what number do you think is okay? And why do you (the TNR person) get to determine that? The people doing TNR should contain the cats on their property – period.

        Some colonies may not be made by TNR folks, but some are – through establishing barn cat programs or simply setting up new colonies in the back yards of folks. And then they add to existing colonies when there is a problem elsewhere and cats need to be relocated. TNR exacerbates the situation more than helps.

        TNR doesn’t take place in a closed setting, so fixing is not enough, and then there is the food. You don’t understand population dynamics either. It is not as simple as ‘fix the cat, no more babies’. And I am not going to bother to explain all that to someone who has TNR tunnel vision and who is not willing even to read the science substantiating this.

  • thanksfornothing

    Curious if Jessica is as attached to other invasive species like Zebra mussels and Burmese pythons, or just the ones that are cute, furry, and easily anthropomorphized?

  • MM

    Just how long does one now have to wait for a comment to be approved? I know of someone else waiting, too. Why did you change to this?

  • MM

    Ah okay, no outside links allowed any more I see. So Jess, can’t provide links for you. Go to abc birds dot org, click on cats, then go to resources for the papers Loss et al 2013 and Longcore et al 2009.

  • Dirk

    Boy does this guy love the sound of his own voice! Get over yourself MM. If I want to find accurate information about cats I’m not going to a website for birds. Please. Talk about bias. It’s clear now this is your only social outlet. Fly away.

    • MM

      This GAL thinks you’re funny. :) If you took a moment to go to the website I mentioned, you would see that the science listed is about cat impact on wildlife, something that ecologists and wildlife biologists study, not TNR caregivers.

  • Sal Grey

    MM has it right. In fact, Julie Levy’s study, cherry picked by TNR advocates to support TNR, concludes that TNR is ineffective at reducing colony numbers in any significant way, confirms that all cats in colonies can never be trapped for sterilization, and concludes that it can take 12 to 30 years to show any decline whatever. That is not what ACA and Best Friends tell you from that study. Indeed, one of the first TNR colonies established in the 70′s, located in London, has never been extinguished. Billions of birds and small mammals are slaughtered in that period of time; human health is threatened by rabies, toxoplasmosis, cat scratch fever, and other diseases; property rights are restricted, cat feeders are exempted from sanitation requirements that other pet owners must follow, and from legal liability for property damage and personal injury caused by the cats registered to them, and more unpleasant consequences of TNR. It seems website links are not accepted here, but there is a youtube video, “Trap, Neuter, and Release: Bad for Cats, Disaster for Birds” that exposes some followup studies on long existing TNR colonies. None of these colonies were extinguished by TNR. Some stabilized after an initial reduction back to original numbers, and some increased in size.What TNR advocates don’t tell you is that TNR is a perpetual maintenance program, not a colony elimination program.

    MM mentioned TENVAC (trap-evaluate-neuter-vaccinate-adopt-contain), a cat sanctuary method, as a better option that TNR. SHE IS RIGHT. TENVAC protects human health, wildlife, property rights, and the cats. TNR is an irresponsible dumping program that replicates the human behavior that made feral cats in the first place: abandonment. TENVAC accepts responsibility for the care of the cats. .TNR is unjust, disrespectful, self serving and hurts the cats themselves. It is NOT a management program. Nothing is managed in TNR. Throwing out food is not management. TENVAC is a management program because it accepts responsibility for the care of the cats, has a facility, a management team, structure, and accountability. TENVAC acknowledges and respects the feelings and desires of all stakeholders, and protects everyone. Unlike TNR, TENVAC is honest; it doesn’t try to skew anything toward a personal agenda. There is no personal agenda.

    And here is the mother lode of hypocrisy: Best Friends, according to its website, runs the TENVAC sanctuary method on its 1,000 acres in Utah! Did you get that? BF does not run TNR on its property. What are they not telling you verbally, but are telling you by example? That TNR is not good for them, but good for you? Hmmm. Yet, BF pushes TNR and gives money to cities to create TNR programs. Here is a quote from their website, Cat World section: “There are more than 700 cats at Best Friends’ Cat World. It’s really a cat village, made of attractive houses along a quiet dirt road. Each house provides a free-roaming environment with indoor comfort and screened-in porches for cats with a wide variety of special needs. There’s a house just for cats with feline leukemia, as well as a suite for cats who are incontinent. Here, they all live a life of dignity, receiving the medical care, food, attention and love they need to heal from a hard life’s journey and prepare for permanent homes.” How ideal, what a wonderful life for the cats. It sure is not a description of the horrible fate cats endure when dumped back to the streets under TNR.

    TENVAC, because of love, security, and respect for ALL. Once again, I cannot list website addresses for information on TENVAC, but if you google Hillsborough Animal Health Foundation, the site will come up and you can read about TENVAC and the AWAKE program.

  • Myra

    TENVAC may be good for situations where cats cannot be returned because the area is dangerous or if the population is so high that the area could use a decrease in number, however TENVAC is unsustainable. It does not solve the breeding occurring at the original site or when new cats move in and breed again. It is the same as trap and remove, which is an endless cycle.

    • MM

      Why is danger to cats the only or one of the only concerns? There is no good reason to put the cats back. Remove them, the food, the shelter, you’re done. The whole point is that TENVAC is sustainable, certainly from an ecological perspective. This vacuum effect nonsense is based on territoriality and that is a fallacy. Cats are territorial for two reasons – to breed and to eat. In TNR where some cats are fixed and where there is unlimited food, the cats are not going to prevent others from joining. This is why caregivers can add cats to existing colonies.; If TNR actually resulted in colony elimination, then what would happen according to your logic? More cats. So then what? Put new cats there? TNR is endless, not removal.

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