Officials warn reservoirs are filling up

With the wet winter followed by this warm weather - reservoirs are filling up.

Randy Julander, Snow Survey Supervisor with the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service, said we got a brief break last week.

"The cool week that we just had was very instrumental in suppressing stream flows. Stream flows right now are running much, much lower than they have been last week and the week before," said Julander.

However, now the rivers are going to be flowing fast with this week's warmer weather.

"The stream flow is going to be cooking again. It's really going to be moving fast by the time the weekend comes around," said Julander.

It's a double edge sword because it’s also good for our water supply.

"With full reservoirs right now water managers are able to use surplus water that they normally wouldn't be able to count on," said Julander.

However, Glen Merrill, a Meteorologist with the National Weather Service, said it’s bad for flooding potential.

"We still have some flooding threats moving forward especially later this month late May into early June," said Merrill.

This year is certainly not the norm.

"In Utah the old adage is feast or famine and it's mostly famine," said Julander.

We haven't had a good year like this in terms of water supply since 2011. Before that it was 2005.

The national weather service is keeping their eyes peeled on flood prone areas.

"Moving forward, the Logan River especially. That's an area we're paying very close attention to," said Merrill.

In Logan, there is still 30 to 40 inches of water stored in the snowpack.

They're also monitoring the headwaters in the Provo River and weber canyon.

However, perhaps the biggest threat is the dangerous conditions for people who want to play in the rivers and streams.

"These rivers are moving extremely fast. They're extremely cold. They're very dangerous," said Merrill.

In the past month, we've had three people drown in raging rivers.

So you want to keep a close eye on your children and pets as we approach the Memorial Day weekend.

In terms of flooding, the national weather service doesn't expect any imminent threat in the next seven to 10 days, but they do expect some issues by the end of the month and into early June.