How to help: Northern California wildfire relief

A case for eating more eggs + 3 recipes to try

Dietitian Trish Brimhall tells us why we should eat more eggs.

Eggs are amazing 70 calorie packages of nutrition.  They pack 7 grams of protein and 13 vitamins and minerals.  But there are loads of different eggs in the refrigerated section of your grocery store, so how do you know what is myth and what is must-know when it comes to eggs?

First of all, you can’t judge an egg by its cover.  A brown egg is not inherently more nutritious than a white egg.  Shell color is simply an indication of the kind of chicken it came from.

Are there nutrition differences?  Sure.  Certain free-range, or enhanced diet chickens can lay eggs that are higher in certain nutrients, but be wary when it comes to trusting the labels used to market and mark up egg price.

All eggs are hormone and antibiotic free, so don’t let those labels sway you.  Cage-free can mean that hens were raised solely indoors, but without cages.  Also, free-range can mean they get a short recess outside while being kept mostly indoors.

Don’t forget to factor in price.  While a higher omega-3 content may sound appealing, in an overall varied and balanced diet it may not be worth the extra $4 a dozen in price.

If you are a serious egg-consumer, the ideal source would be to find someone local that raises chickens so you can see exactly how there are raised and what they are fed.  That will give you the most nutrition bang for your buck.

Since eggs can be budget-friendly protein source, consider a few more creative ways to incorporate them into your menu:

Egg pizza:

http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/ellie-krieger/egg-ham-and-spinach-pizza-recipe

Baked Avocado Eggs:

http://spoonuniversity.com/recipe/baked-egg-avocado

Egg-Stuffed Baked Potato

http://ourbestbites.com/2012/02/an-idaho-sunrise-egg-stuffed-baked-potatoes/

You can get more information from her here.