Clinton on final day of the campaign: ‘We have to heal this country’

Hillary Clinton speaks at a rally in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania on November 7, 2016.

Hillary Clinton speaks at a rally in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania on November 7, 2016.

By MJ Lee and Dan Merica

CNN

PITTSBURGH (CNN) — Hillary Clinton delivered her closing message of the 2016 campaign Monday, pleading with Americans to reject Donald Trump’s “pessimistic” worldview and look ahead to the work that needs to be done after Election Day.

“Tomorrow is the election, but that is just the beginning,” Clinton said at a campaign rally in Pittsburgh. “We have to heal this country. We have to bring people together, to listen and respect each other.”

Clinton’s remarks came on the final day of what has been a dark and vitriolic presidential campaign, during the Democratic nominee’s first of four stops planned for the day. Her day includes stops in Michigan — a blue state that she hopes to keep in her column; Philadelphia, where she will hold a large evening rally with President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama; and a midnight rally in Raleigh, North Carolina.

The former secretary of state and her campaign have been intently focused on get-out-the-vote and early voting efforts over the last few weeks, urging Americans to resist the temptation to stay home and vote before November 8 if they can. On Monday, just hours ahead of Election Day, Clinton stressed the importance of heading to the ballot box Tuesday for those who have not yet voted.

With a renewed sense of urgency, Clinton said voting tomorrow is a “vote for yourself, vote for your family, vote for your futures.”

And as she has been doing throughout the general election, Clinton sought to paint a stark contrast between her candidacy and Trump’s.

“We don’t have to accept a dark and divisive vision for America,” she said. “Tomorrow you can vote for a hopeful, inclusive, big-hearted America. Our core values are being tested in this election.”

Clinton even urged voters that confront long lines Tuesday: “Please wait.”

“In early voting, we have had people waiting in line for two and three hours,” she said. “And there have been reporters and others going up and down the line asking people, all kinds of Americans, not one type, all types, ‘Why are you here?’ ‘Because my future depends on it,’ they say.”

Several hours later, campaigning in Allendale, Michigan, just outside of Grand Rapids, Clinton stressed that the support she has received from Republicans across the aisle signals “why this election is so different.”

“It’s why so many Republicans have spoken out to endorse me and support me,” Clinton said, adding that some Republicans “have taken very courageous stands against the nominee of their own party.”

“Because they believe that we must put country ahead of party,” she said.

Once again painting Trump’s vision as “pessimistic” and dark, the Democratic nominee said she simply doesn’t see the country through her opponent’s lens.

“People look at us with yearning,” Clinton said. “We are already great, but we can be greater. And we will be greater.”

The-CNN-Wire
™ & © 2016 Cable News Network, Inc., a Time Warner Company. All rights reserved.