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What was Utah like in 1916? Time capsule opened at the Utah State Capitol

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SALT LAKE CITY -- Using power tools, Governor Gary Herbert painstakingly opened a copper box containing a time capsule from 1916.

The box was unearthed from inside a column adorning the Capitol building last week. Before a crowd inside the rotunda on Monday, the governor opened it and plucked out the contents for all to see.

It contained some coins, a photograph of the original Capitol commission (who dedicated the building), a two cent stamp, a book entitled "Latter-day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia," and a lot of newspapers.

Governor Gary Herbert and members of the Utah State Legislature inspect the contents of a 1916 time capsule. (Photo by Ben Winslow, FOX 13 News)

Governor Gary Herbert and members of the Utah State Legislature inspect the contents of a 1916 time capsule. (Photo by Ben Winslow, FOX 13 News)

"Newspapers were the thing of the day, which is a little contrary to what's happening today, we're going more social media," the governor quipped as he pulled out a copy of the now-extinct Provo Post.

After unearthing the capsule, Governor Herbert suggested the state should create a new time capsule to be opened in 2116. FOX 13 asked him what it might include.

"I would think something about our electronic age, maybe an iPhone or an iPad. Maybe with a message and a charger they could plug in or some photos on it. An iphone, they couldn't even dream about it 100 years ago," he said.

A time capsule from 1916 and the contents it contained are spread out at the Utah State Capitol. (Photo by Ben Winslow, FOX 13 News)

A time capsule from 1916 and the contents it contained are spread out at the Utah State Capitol. (Photo by Ben Winslow, FOX 13 News)

Attending the time capsule opening were a group of centenarians, people who are 100 years or older. One man, who is 102, remembered traveling as a child from Gunnison to see the Capitol building. Another 100-year-old man eventually worked here as Utah's official bee inspector.

The time capsule's opening is part of a weeklong series of events to honor the 100 year anniversary of the Utah State Capitol, one of the state's most iconic buildings. The event features tours through Oct. 7 from 9 a.m. to 8 p.m., concerts inside the rotunda from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., and special events on Saturday ending with a gala and fireworks that night.