Former teacher in Magna charged for allegedly watching porn in his classroom

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MAGNA, Utah — A former Cyprus High School teacher who was allegedly watching pornography while alone in his classroom is facing a misdemeanor charge for accessing indecent material on school property.

According to a statement of probable cause filed earlier this month, a counselor at Cyprus High School stopped by Douglas M. Lind’s classroom in January and found his door locked.

The counselor reported the teacher noticed her and came over and opened the door, at which point she heard moaning noises and profane statements relating to sexual intercourse coming from the teacher’s desk area. Lind then walked over to his desk and silenced the noise, the counselor stated.

A few days later, a police officer with Granite School District made arrangements to examine the teacher’s cell phone and micro SD card so data could be extracted.

According to the PC statement, Lind admitted the counselor entered his classroom at the time she mentioned and he admitted that he did download pornographic material from a website onto his cell phone and SD card.

Ben Horsley, Granite School District, said they were made aware of the allegations on January 21, and Lind was put on paid administrative leave on January 22. Lind resigned from his position as a teacher on March 25.

There is no indication any students were present when the incident occurred.

8 comments

  • Wannabob

    This is a good example of how porn kills brain cells. You don’t think things through – like maybe closing out of your browser or turning the sound off before answering the knock at your door.

  • Anonymous

    This is the second Stage crew teacher at Cyprus High School to lose their job because of porn. I’m shocked that the Granite School District doesn’t have anything to say and that he was on paid leave instead of being fired on the spot. If you can’t search it, it doesn’t need to be at a school. Regardless of what it is, he was aware of this. I mean, he worked there for 21 years.

  • Whoopie-Doo

    It was his personal phone. He was not using school equipment (computer, phone, wi-fi). I would not have handed my phone over to Granite PD unless they had a warrant.

      • Whoopie-Doo

        What does the Granite School District contract say? I could understand it if the equipment used belong to the school… there would be no right to privacy, but personal equipment… Granite PD’s walking a fine line here.

      • bob

        No they’re not. They asked for it, and he handed it to them. No warrant needed.

        Many workplace contracts include permission to search personal belongings, including electronics.

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