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Family remembers Orem woman apparently shot, killed by ex-boyfriend

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OREM, Utah -- An Orem family shared their grief and opened up about what they think led to the death of their daughter.

Orem Police said 27-year-old Brittany Engstrom was shot by 37-year-old David Driscoll, who later shot and killed himself after a standoff in Eagle Mountain on Monday.

Engstrom's family and friends said her life had been on the upswing, and she had a lot to look forward to.

"She was a very hardworking person," her boyfriend, Chris Smith said. "She was one of the best mothers I've ever seen."

The mother of two had just graduated from Provo College earlier this month after studying to become a physical therapist's assistant.

Smith said they were making plans for their future together.

After a rough few years, the pieces seemed to be falling into place.

"She was finally getting her life together," said her father Emmett Engstrom. "She had her whole life to look forward to."

But on Monday, Brittany Engstrom was found dead, shot several times while alone in her apartment.

Emmett Engstrom said there was no question who was behind it.

"I knew exactly who it was," he said.

Brittany Engstrom had been trying to kick Driscoll out of her life, the family said.

"Ever since she started going out with this guy, we could see problems right off the bat," Emmett Engstrom explained.

Problems like stalking and angry outbursts, he said. Issues that her father said kept going long after they broke up.

On top of that, Driscoll was in trouble with the law, facing four counts of felony aggravated child sexual abuse. He was due in court the day after Brittany Engstrom's death.

Smith said they tried everything to keep Driscoll away.

"It was to the point where we were adding additional locks in the house, trying to see if we could find security cameras to put up," he said.

Engstrom even got a conceal carry permit and a gun, the family reported. And she moved to a new apartment complex.

They also said they made calls to police, and a court ordered Driscoll to stay away.

But nothing, not even the law, was enough.

Now, both lives are gone. The family won't get closure taking Driscoll to court.

"Somebody as wonderful as her didn't deserve that," Smith said.

The only thing he and the Engstrom family have left—Brittany Engstrom's two surviving daughters, as they grieve for her death and wonder what could have been done to save her.

"I love her and I miss her," Smith said. "I hope she knows that everybody else loves her and misses her."