Salt Lake Comic Con means big crowds and big business

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SALT LAKE CITY - Fans, get your costumes on and your cameras ready. The first day of Comic Con in Salt Lake starts Thursday.

Even if you're not into the wigs or costumes, Salt Lake Comic Con has a super human impact on Utah’s economy and local businesses.

“It's bringing a lot of dollars to the state of Utah keeping a lot of dollars here,” said Utah Attorney General Sean Reyes.

The annual event is drawing in big crowds and dollars with celebrity line ups.

“My favorite Comic Con. It really is and I don't say that. I’m not saying that because I’m here; it's really the nicest one here,” said Marina Sirtis, who stars in Star Trek: The Next Generation.

 

Among the thousands of superheroes and villains are local business owners. Patrick Evans, owner of Rocket Fizz in Salt Lake City, sets up a booth every year at the convention.

“We hand out coupons and free stuff and we do a sample of our candy and our sodas and it's just a great way for us to drum up some more business,” Evans said. “Economically there's always a spike we always see a boost for about two to three weeks after the fact."

This was artist Ben Darling's first time at Salt Lake Comic Con.

“Selling this work will help me get noticed by larger companies like Marvel and DC and get me into my dream job,” Darling said. “This has really turned into the nerd mecca it’s like Disney World for people like me."

Hundreds of hotel rooms are booked out for the event and the Utah Transit Authority and businesses close to the Salt Palace Convention Center are also seeing increased business.

“It's exceeded my expectations, but I always believed it had this potential but I didn't know it would get here so quickly,” said Dan Farr, Salt Lake Comic Con founder.