Program to reduce Utah’s high water use announced

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MURRAY, Utah -- The Utah Rivers Council and local government leaders are encouraging urban Utahns to install rain water collection barrels to reduce water use and improve the water quality of Utah's streams, rivers and lakes.

The barrels, which collect water from rain gutters, are being made available for $40 for Salt Lake County residents and $74 for everyone else through the RainHarvest program.

According to the Utah Rivers Council, Utah uses more water per person than any other state in the nation, averaging 248 gallons per person each day.

"This RainHarvest program is being practiced in over 50 cities across the country, where municipalities buy these rain barrels in bulk quantity and pass the savings on to the consumer," said Zach Frankel, a representative for the Utah Rivers Council. "It's time for Utah to get after this rain barrel program and catch up to other cities across the country that have been investing in water conservation for decades."

Frankel said the program can also help Utahns save money on their water bills. The rain water barrels can be pre-ordered here and picked up Saturday, May 9th at Murray Park.

 

17 comments

  • William

    Before you buy and use any rain water collection and storage equipment, check your local water rights. Because believe it or not you might not own the rights to the rain that falls in your own backyard.

      • utah_1

        In Utah, without a water right, you can collect up to (2) 100 gal closed tanks of rainwater, OR you can register at the state water website for free and then you can collect up to a total of 2500 gal in closed tanks.

        You don’t have to register if you limit it to (2) closed tanks, providing the tanks are less than 100 gal each.
        The law was passed in 2010 and changes to add flexibility were added in 2013.

  • Nick

    So is utah repealing the law that made it illegal to collect rain water in this state? I think hell just froze over…lol

    • water!

      It’s not illegal anymore. Used to be for a short time but that has been reversed quite a while ago.

  • JP

    Why aren’t we having a discussion about why we are the second driest state in the country yet we use more water per person in the country? Seriously is that what we want to say about the people of Utah?

    • Finny Wiggen

      Your comment seems logical, until you look at and consider the reality of all the facts. Yes we are indeed the second driest state, and yes we do use the most water power person, but there is a very big caveat that you are over looking.

      We happen to live in the very bottom of the great basin. Every single drop of water that we “save”, every single drop, will end up in the great salt lake as useless salt water. We are the very last stop in the hundreds of mile journey before this useful fresh water becomes salty waste water.

      If we don’t use it, absolutely no one ever will. Nor will it be used by pants, or wildlife… Except of course brine shrimp.

      Sure, it sounds sensational to suggest that Utahns ate being wasteful. But the reality is otherwise. The reality is that we are using it before it gets dumped into a lake making it useless to almost all life on earth.

      • miles (dave)

        finny i sure hope your not one of those people who have your sprinklers watering the sidewalk and road, and i fear that because id guess you would justify that with the comment you gave

        anyway like the comments above talk about, a lot of the water that ends up landing on your lawn that dose not end up getting evaporated ends up in the great basin aquifer. but thats just a little bit most ends up in the gutters which ends up in local streams and rivers and then ends up in the salt lake but on its way there in places it seeps into the underground water system and part of it ends up in the verious water tables and some eventually in the aquifer,

        but when it comes to the water you use to water your grass that comes from two possible places

        1 secondary water, which here in the ogden area comes from either pine view reservoir or the weber river which comes from other reservoirs like lost crick

        2 primary, culinary, potable water which comes from some of those same rivers and streams on the way to the salt lake, some from local underground water tables, and some from the great basin aquifer,

        anyway you can literally drive to a lot of these places and watch the water level rise and lower over the years, and the aquifer is also measured

        my point is there is a calculable amount of water we have access too. and its those who let the water run down the street that take the fresh water in the reservoir and underground and help to put a lot of it into the salt lake where it is then evaporated to recycle, the trouble is that evaporated water does not all end up back in the collection areas for our use. a lot of it dosent even end up back in utah it ends up in other states. thats why we have access to less of it now than when we are in heavy watery years

        so its those who dont save but instead waist water that end up putting it into the salt lake, if you dont waste it, it either stays in the reservoir or it evaporates to be recycled

        http://www.water.utah.gov/brochures/uws_broc.htm

      • Finny Wiggen

        Yes Dave, of course there is a quantitative amount of water… no one is suggesting otherwise. You miss the point of my comment entirely.

        That amount of water absolutely has to be managed, and again, I do not suggest otherwise. Rather I am stating the obvious. That this specific amount of water has to be divided between those needs that exist in our valley. As long as we cover these needs, no one is evil or out of line.

        The dummy who I am replying to suggests that there is something wrong with Utahns because we use so much water. This is absurd. We use what we have. As our population grows, the amount of water we have will remain the same, and so each individual will have to use less. Period.

        But to suggest that anyone is out of line today, because we use the water that is impossible to move to any other part of the country, and that will just go to waste if it is not used is absurd.

      • miles (dave)

        i see. the main part that concerned me was when you said “Every single drop of water that we “save”, every single drop, will end up in the great salt lake as useless salt water.” that gave me the image of you spraying your lawn with as much water as possible without care because of an idea like “if it dosent end up on my lawn right now it will be gone forever”

  • utah_1

    In Utah, without a water right, you can collect up to (2) 100 gal closed tanks of rainwater, or you can register at the state water website for free and then you can collect up to a total of 2500 gal in closed tanks. You don’t have to register if you limit it to (2) closed tanks, providing the tanks are less than 100 gal each. The law was passed in 2010 and changes to add flexibility were added in 2013.

  • Pat

    I live in Sandy (Salt lake county) but when I go to order it says $40 price is only for Murray city residents. ???

  • Lillie

    Selling your broken auto for hard cash to a good and
    dependable damaged car dealership is likely to lower out
    a whole lot of problems. In 2007, Flipswap put
    enough mobile phones back into circulation to keep the equivalent of 50 tons of solid waste out of US landfills.
    You can call your Attorney General’s office to find out the state of limitations in your own state.

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