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Family of fallen officer to launch website that follows police in their daily lives

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UTAH COUNTY -- One Utah County family is trying to make a difference, as tensions continue to rise across the country between the public and police following another fatal shooting in Missouri.

"It's frustrating because people are so quick to judge police," said Nathan Mohler.

Mohler said it's hard to watch the public criticism of police knowing his stepfather, Sgt. Cory Wride, gave his life to that very profession. He was shot and killed this past January, while attempting to help what he thought was a stranded motorist near Eagle Mountain.

"With all the stuff that's going on now, it is even harder just because of the disdain that people have for police, it just keeps bringing the thought back up," Mohler said.

The Wride family is in the process of launching a website, utahcode4.com, that gives the public a better understanding of law enforcement, by following around officers and deputies with a camera, and sharing their daily lives, on and off the job.

"Showing their family side of life, letting people actually get to know the real side of these officers, rather than the guy you see pull you over and walk up to your window," Mohler said.

Mohler said he and his siblings saw firsthand, through their own father, the emotion officers and deputies go through.

"There wasn't one of us that he didn't come and pick up and rock and cry because he had to deal with a kid our age getting hurt or killed," Mohler said. "We're going to show how they feel after they pull someone over, how they feel after they break up a husband beating up his wife, how they feel after they resuscitate a baby."

Mohler said the website and videos are just one of many ways his father's mission to serve and protect will live on.

"It helps us to feel like he died for something, and if we can make the lives better for his brothers it's worth it,” Mohler said.

The website utahcode4.com is expected to be launched by the end of 2014.