Historic cabin moved across Lehi

This is an archived article and the information in the article may be outdated. Please look at the time stamp on the story to see when it was last updated.

LEHI, Utah - A log cabin built in the late 19th Century underwent a major move across Lehi on Thursday.

The cabin was once home to a Utah homesteader in Bull River. For the last several decades, Marilyn Larson has been using it as a pig pen, but now it's making a move to the Hutching Museum.

Thursday's move isn't the first for the cabin; it's been moved three times since the 1880s. But it's been sitting in one place for awhile, so Larson was worried about it making the move.

"It has sat in the place it was for a long time. And I was afraid when they moved it, the logs would come apart. But the guys that are moving it stabilized everything, re-shifted it so it was perfectly square again," Larson said.

The cabin's movers had to jack up the house, push it a few feet, then move it again.

"When you move a house you basically build a trailer underneath it to jack it up," said David Valgardson, one of the movers. "We actually have to slide it back into the positioning where it goes. There's about a three-foot fence that we've got to go over the top of it. And then we'll set it down."

It took the Sons of the Utah Pioneers years to figure out a way to get the old cabin across town, an effort they think will be worth it in the long run.